Tag Archive: road kill


The ‘MUNCHIES’ Food Channel Presents:

 THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR

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Capture - Roadkill Connoisseur - Flesh is flesh

cooking…

Southern Fried Squirrel”

& “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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IMG_1042A ‘How to’ film for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

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I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel - “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show is pretty funny, lol.

 

Click on the recipe titles for ingredients and methods.  if the link doesn’t work yet it is because the post is still under construction!

Save this page and I will update ASAP.

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Southern Fried Squirrel”

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“Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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freemantlemedia uk

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Orientation Travel Productions and Dutch host Thomas Acda go on a “Roadkill Road Trip” around North Yorkshire with yours truly!

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orientationSpent a wonderfully full day on a warm and sunny Summer Solstice filming a pilot episode with the Orientation Production team of five wonderfully funny folk from the Netherlands.

The host, Thomas Acda, is a well known rock star, song writer, actor and comedian.  He is making a series very similar to that of Anthony Bourdain; traveling the world, meeting new and interesting people and having epiphanies through culinary experiences.

The day was spent foraging, exploring the beautiful countryside, looking for roadkill, cooking it, chatting and having a fun time.  We ended around a camp fire with some fantastic friends/ local musicians.  We certainly showed them some good old Yorkshire hospitality.

Sorry, not allowed to post anything else until the program is aired on mainstream Dutch TV this year.  Will post links ASAP.

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Making a “How To…” film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel!

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IMG_1042“How To Cook Roadkill” for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel - “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Stickers Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show promises to be pretty funny, lol.

It should be ready to view online in a few months with a working title of “From Tarmac to Table!”.

freemantlemedia ukCan’t disclose anything else because it hasn’t aired yet but will post the link ASAP. X

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Making movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

claudia nye mugshotLately I have been making movies with the ultra talented Claudia Nye.

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media.

Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors.

These movies are for Woodlands.TV and should be ready to view online in a few months.

Can’t disclose which films are being made yet but will post the links ASAP. X

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woodlands_TV         films for web claudia nye                   woodlands_Master logo

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“POLARITY”

“Cernunnos and The Bringer Of Light to Dark Places” – AKA – “The Horned Lord and the Witch”.

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The Joining - Cernunos & The  Bringer Of Light to Dark Places.  Lino Print 08

The Joining – Cernunos & The Bringer Of Light to Dark Places. Lino Print 08

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“The feminine is pure, boundless and infinite energy moving freely without any particular direction.

It is directionless but immense, ever changing, beautiful and destructive.
The feminine is the force of life and source of inspiration.
The feminine moves in all directions, the masculine moves in one direction.
The feminine needs the masculine to give it direction, focus and purpose.
The masculine needs the energy of the feminine to give it drive and passion.
The masculine and the feminine need each other.
The masculine directs while the feminine projects.
This is the relationship of yin and yang”.

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I highly recommend the work and books of David Deida.  His Tantric wisdom has changed my life, sex and relationships forever!

 

  Marcus Cernunos

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“The Horned Lord”

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“The Witch”

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 Look out for blogs on my other ART projects – SHAMANIC ROADKILL CAPE, PLACENTA  ART & COOKERY, PLACENTA BOOTIES,  PLACENTA DISCO-BOOTIES, SHAMANIC SHAKTI BEAVER MERKINANTI  BADGER-CULL TRIP-TIC, ROADKILL SQUIRREL TESTICLE EARRINGS  , BURNING-MAN ASARO MUD-FAMILY PERFORMANCE ART , JAPANESE WISHING TREE and many many more!!

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DISCLAIMER… Before I start I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

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“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

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Is it still fresh?

What most people visualise when they think of roadkill.

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I get asked many questions, one of the most common is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an “Easy to Remember” ROAD-SIDE ROAD-KILL HEALTH & SAFETY CULINARY CHECKLIST! 

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Okay, at this point there may be some eyebrow twitching or full-on belly laughs…. “Health and Culinary you say? In the same sentence as Roadkill???   Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!”…. but seriously, you will be surprised at how healthy roadkill can be.

Wild food foraging isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being in tune with nature and our bodies.  Some of its benefits are that it uses less packaging, less chemicals, less food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancer and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are boosted naturally.

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Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

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I asked some “wordsmithy” friends if they wanted to help me to create a  humourous mnemonic.  Mnemonics are memory devices that help learners recall larger pieces of information, especially in the form of lists like characteristics, steps, stages, parts, phases, etc.  For the list I had in mind this was the perfect tool.

My dear old friend Mark “BUZZ” Busby did me, and all you fellow “Splatter Spotters”, very proud indeed with this…

Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

Thank You Buzz!  You’re a genius! 

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Soooo!  That is the quick and easy way to remember the essential pointers:

‘Damage’, ‘Eyes’, ‘Fleas & Flies’, ‘Rigor Mortis’, ‘Skin’, ‘Blood’, ‘Law’, ‘Diseases’, Smell’ and last but not least ‘Climate & Cooking’.

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Damage

roadkill20n-1-webAvoid animals that have been badly damaged or ruptured internally.  Check the animal carefully before stuffing it in the boot of the car (gloves are recommended and a plastic bag or tarp).  If you saw the accident happen then you know it is definitely fresh.  If you didn’t, only pick up those that have ‘bounced’ from being hit cleanly once, preferably to the side of the road, and with someone else’s car, lol.  Obviously, don’t pick up something that’s been run over a couple or ten times, looks sick or abnormal!!

Eyes

black rabbit eyeWhat do the eyes look like?  Are there any eyes at all?

Carrion birds arrive at the scene of a road traffic accident quickly and especially first thing in the morning.  Eyes are soft, succulent and easy to pluck!  If there is still an eye left on the underside check  it to see if it is still clear.  Cloudy eyes can indicate that it isn’t fresh anymore.

 

Fleas & Flies

flies on foxThis is easy to remember – “FLEAS GOOD!  FLIES BAD!”.  Living & active fleas are a good sign of freshness – fleas will soon evacuate a cold dead body.  If you feel squeamish about fleas a 24 hour spell in the deep freeze will finish them off.

Flies will find a carcass quickly, especially in warm weather.  You may find tiny clusters of fresh long, white, oblong shaped eggs around the eyes, mouth, or other orifices.  This is not so bad if you don’t intend to eat these bits and the eggs have only just been laid.  If you are not sure about this or anything else mentioned so far, leave it be.

Do do not pick anything up that is old enough to be crawling with beetles, maggots or other larvae.  be wary of ticks that may carry Lymes Disease.  Contain ticks on a deer carcass whilst in the car using a sheet or plastic tarp.

 

Rigor Mortis

rigor mortisA stiff animal could just be in Rigor which means it’s still fresh, but keep in mind the previous tips when judging time of death.

The rate at which Rigor Mortis sets in will depend on several factors such as the animals physique, cause of death and the climate.  Different sources give different figures, but very broadly and in ‘average’ circumstances with roadkill it begins from 1/2 hr (bird) – 24 hrs (deer).   It becomes complete in about 12 hours or more.

Then the body relaxes again, this time as a result of decomposition. This is known as resolution of rigor.  The stiffness in the muscle tissues begins to decrease owing to the enzymatic breakdown of collagen that hold muscle fibers together. This phenomenon is also referred to as “Aging of Meat”.  This aging effect produces meats that are more tender and palatable, hence the ‘hanging of game’!

 

Skin

Rabbit-FurDoes the skin have fur or feathers attached to it?  Give fur a gentle tug to see if it is still firmly rooted in the skin.  You don’t want chunks of hair falling out easily.   Alopecia could be a sure sign that the carcass is too old or that the animal was suffering from a disease.

The skin will move freely across the muscles if the carcass is fresh.  Black or purple marks can indicate where the animal has been hit, these are okay, but you may want to cut the severely bruised bits of meat away before cooking.

 

Blood

roadkill badgerThere shouldn’t be that much blood on a carcass suitable for eating.  A bloody mouth or nose is fairly normal.

Ideally any blood needs to be fresh, wet and bright red.  Blood or no, you should use gloves to handle dead animals, you still have to get back in the car and touch the steering wheel, your passengers, packed lunch, etc.  Always keep a stash of wet wipes handy!

 

Law

The-LawGenerally, the UK is pretty good at allowing folk to dine from the road.  Farmed animals like sheep and pigs belong to someone so they should be reported.  Wild animals aren’t classified as ‘owned’ unless they’re specifically being farmed, in which case they need to be on land secured by fencing, so you’d not be likely to hit them.  If found on the road they are “Fair Game”.  Domestic animals like cats and dogs should also be reported.

I am no expert on the laws of other countries, so check yourself if you really need to know specifics.

 

Diseases

Tuberculosis-virusDo Your “Zoonotic” Disease Homework!  It is essential to research the kinds of diseases certain wild animals can catch or carry and what signs to look for.  Very rarely do they transfer to humans if proper procedures are followed.  Avoid giving anything you are NOT unquestionably sure about to YOUNG CHILDREN, the ENFEEBLED or PREGNANT WOMEN, just to be on the safe side.

Cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically all nasties!  That includes ToxoplasmosisBovine TB, Myxomatosis and even Rabies!!

I would be wary of eating badger from the road at the moment…. farmers who view badgers as health threats are putting their poisoned animals by the roadside to make them ‘look’ like roadkill… so be warned.  I am not touching badgers for a while.

 

Smell

sniffing the deadListen to your nose… if it smells rotten, don’t take it!

You can tell a lot by smell before you start to butcher.  Smell and flavour in all meat is a combination of age, exercise, species, breed and diet.  Wild animal meat can smell quite strong and ‘gamey’.

Fat is also the home of any weird or odd smell you might find in wild game; and because of its unsaturated nature also meas it goes rancid faster.   Don’t ditch good wild fat though, it is very high in important vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids.

The varied diet of a game animal means that any fat-soluble ester or terpene or other flavour molecule that critter has metabolized will end up on your dinner plate.

If it smells okay on the outside but when you open it up it smells much more than just gamey don’t eat it.  Intestines have their own unique scent which you get used to and can judge accordingly.  Mild gas, urine and a bit of poop may be normal too, so use your instincts on all this until experience tells you otherwise.

Male animals in rutting season can be very ‘musky’ and not palatable.  No surprise there!  lol.

 

Climate & Cooking

snow roadkill deer warningCold and dry climates are better for freshness; nature makes a great fridge and freezer sometimes.  Be careful in warm and hot weather – bugs find the dead quickly and meat spoils easily.

Consider how long the animal will be stored in a warm vehicle after you have claimed it.  Use the cooler parts of the car, for example NOT in the passenger foot-well with the floor heater on full.  I have put a small animal in a plastic bag before now and secured it tightly on the outside of a wound-up window!  Looked weird but it worked wonderfully!

When you get to your final destination prepare or preserve your carcass ASAP.

As mentioned earlier, cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically everything!

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As you can see, you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s not rocket science!! 

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

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close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

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Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

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oh deer

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To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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TB – “TOTAL BOLLOCKS!” – My Rant on the Plan to Unnecessarily Cull British Badgers.

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TUFTY-TASTIC “Red” Squirrel Sausages – Casting lessons from the “Roadkill-Sausage Queen”.

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“From Bitumen to Banquet”

Wild Food and Roadkill Preparation and Preservation Workshops
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I am a Roadkill Recycler, Cook and Wild Food Forager. 
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I often hold workshops at camps and small festivals teaching the joys of Roadkill Preparation and Preservation. I also give private tuition and present on cookery “How to…” short films, consult for TV, radio and other media producers.
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I AM AVAILABLE TO FACILITATE AND TAILOR INDIVIDUAL WORKSHOPS AND DEMONSTRATIONS UPON REQUEST
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I love what I do.
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I am a very happy scavenger and I dislike waste.
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true story of a roadkill cook
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Wild Meat!

“It always amazes me how squeamish your average carnivore is!”

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“The interest in eating wild food which includes ‘accidental meat’ as a healthy supplementary food source is becoming increasing popular. Many are realizing that what goes into our seemingly harmless supermarket and shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals.
Most people however view roadkill as ‘flat, furry, diseased and totally disgusting’.

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Eating roadkill has its own very special sociocultural taboos and hurdles to over-come. The first one is that animals falling into the above category are exactly that and not to be touched with someone else’s barge-pole, lol. Traffic casualties fit for human consumption are normally hit once and killed instantly, completely intact with minimum damage.

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Wild food foraging isn’t about being poor or desperate; it’s about being in tune with nature and our bodies. Some of its benefits are that it uses less packaging, less chemicals, less food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancer and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are boosted naturally.”

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My workshops are either individually tailored or totally spontaneous.  They often include discussions about the many symbolic, cultural, moral and ethical meanings and values of “recycling ”.  In particular awareness is raised with regard to the human consumption of Wild and “Accidental Meat” as opposed to the “factory farmed” varieties found in supermarkets and butcher’s shops.

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These sessions always include a practical workshop imparting some of the knowledge required for the preparation of dead animals for food, art and taxidermy.  With regard to eating ‘roadkill’ full instruction on how to identify and prepare road traffic accidents fit for human consumption is gone through step by step using

THE “Easy to Remember” ROAD-SIDE ROAD-KILL CULINARY CHECKLIST

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“I deal with all animals and participants in a sensitive, respectful, responsible and ‘matter of fact’ manner.  I feel that if one intends to be a carnivore , then one would benefit from knowing what the process involves – from beginning to end and in-between.”

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As with much of my work, I aspire to gently push the ‘experiencer’, including myself, to question preconceptions and socio-cultural taboos by creating something delicious, beautiful and compelling, often from something dead and/or socially repulsive.

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Is it still fresh?

Is it still fresh?

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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“When I see a tray of pre-packaged meat, I often wonder how the animal had been fed, what it ate, how it was looked after, respected, transported and finally slaughtered.  Did the animal suffer?  What has been pumped into it?  Is it full of antibiotics and growth hormones?  What is its carbon footprint?  Do I even want to put this meat in my body or offer it to my family?”

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Essential questions, especially if we are to try to live a ‘green’ and sustainable life now and in the future.

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Come and learn a Survival/Life Skill, and maybe even challenge your own perceptions and concepts of “weird”, “disgust”, and fears of death, the unknown and unusual.  You can participate on whatever level you choose be that culinary, survival, spiritual, political or environmental.

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fell edge workshop.

Engage and ask questions, or be a spectator – everyone is welcome – carnivore, vegetarian, vegan and freegan alike.

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Prepare to feel closer to Nature and more in tune with what you eat.

These are not your average workshops!

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Please contact me to discuss your thoughts and requirements.

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Ali cooking
Cooking road kill on Come Dine With Me.
(a 2 minute clip)

 

I get so many questions…

Is it safe to do what you do?

How do you know what to look for?

‘WHY’ do you do what you do?

There are others of course, so I have compiled a page dedicated to the most ‘frequently asked questions’ copied and pasted from various interviews and emails.  I hope you find them useful, informative, or just plain entertaining!

Just scroll down to find one that best fits your curiosity.

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(DISCLAIMER… Before I start I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick eating roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  Thank you. )

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These questions were asked by writer and journalist Louise Tilloston, who was doing an article on ‘Extreme Frugality’.

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Q.1 – Roadkill.  How we do we know it is still fresh? 

Is it still fresh?

Is it still fresh?

Most people think of dirty pancake looking flat red mush  – what I call “Tarmac Jam” – when they think of roadkill and this is far from the truth.  But, how do you really know how fresh it is?

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  • If you saw the accident happen then you know it is definitely fresh.  If you didn’t, only pick up those that have ‘bounced’ from being hit cleanly once, preferably from the side of the road.

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  • Avoid animals that have been badly damaged or ruptured internally.  Check the animal carefully before stuffing it in the boot of the car (gloves are recommended and a plastic bag or tarp).

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  • Good basic indicators of optimal freshness are:
  1. Clear eyes & both eyes are still there.  Birds peck the eyes soon after death or first thing in the morning.
  2. Living & active fleas – fleas will only live on a living body.
  3. Fresh, red un-clotted blood – if any, but a bloody nose is common.
  4. Fur that doesn’t come loose when you pull it – alopecia is a sure sign of age or disease.
  5. Smell – if it smells revolting don’t pick it up.

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  • Rigor mortis sets in within a few hours, then the body will relax again maybe days later, so if it is stiff it could be still fresh, but keep in mind the previous tips when judging time of death.

The rate at which Rigor Mortis sets in will depend on several factors such as the animals physique, cause of death and the climate.  Different sources give different figures, but very broadly and in ‘average’ circumstances with roadkill it begins from 1/2 hr (bird) – 24 hrs (deer) it becomes complete in about 12 hours or more.  After about 72 hours, the body relaxes again, this time as a result of decomposition. This is known as resolution of rigor.  The stiffness in the muscle tissues begins to decrease owing to the enzymatic breakdown of collagen that hold muscle fibres together. This phenomenon is also referred to as Aging of meat. This aging effect produces meats that are more tender and palatable, hence the ‘hanging of game’!

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  • The skin will move much more freely across the muscles if the carcass is fresh.

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  • Listen to your nose… if it smells rotten, don’t take it.  If it smells ok on the outside, but when you open it up it smells very iffy don’t eat it.  Mild stomach gas is usually ok and a bit of poop may be normal too, so use your instincts on this until experience tells you otherwise.

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  • Cold climates are better for freshness; nature makes a great fridge sometimes.  Be careful in hot weather – bugs find the dead quickly.  Do do not pick anything up with maggots or eggs all over it.

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  •  Obviously, don’t pick up something that’s been run over a couple of times!!

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  • It is also essential to research the kinds of diseases certain wild animals can catch or carry and what signs to look for.

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  • Cooking the animal at boiling point thoroughly will kill practically all nasties!  That includes Toxoplasmosis,  Myxomatosis and even Rabies!!  But do your homework!

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As you can see, you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s not rocket science!!  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing.

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Q.2 – Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try. If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat the gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating roadkill is definitely healthier than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today. Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.  Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

Wild food foraging is about more to do with being in tune with nature and our bodies.  Some of its benefits are that it uses less packaging, less chemicals, less food miles and contains less pollution; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancer and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are boosted naturally.

To view the article online click here.

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These Questions and Answers were taken from an interview with Dr. Daniel Allen

To see the blog in relation to this follow this link

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Q.3 –  What was it that made roadkill initially appealing as a source of food?

I remember long ago my father preparing game  in the kitchen, so I wasn’t fazed by seeing dead animals and was used to eating rabbits and pheasants from an early age. I was fascinated by the butchering process and tried to make things from the bit of fur, feet and feathers that were left over (my Dad found it amusing, but my Mum thought it was dirty, lol).

For as long as I can remember I have enjoyed collecting bits of nature and turning them into something else.  As a young adult and an artist who enjoys working with organic and animal materials, I would stop and inspect dead things at the side of the road (UK and abroad) to see if I could learn something about the animal and to see if I could salvage anything… often this is the closest you can get to truly wild animals.  The encounters were always a mix of sadness and fascination.  When an animal was only recently killed, I was curious about eating it, as it seemed a shame not to waste it, however, popular ‘roadkill’ taboo and worry about disease prevented me from doing so.

Eight years ago I saw the car driving in front of me hit a pheasant.  It bounced to the side of the road.  I stopped to pick it up.  “Why couldn’t I eat this?”, I thought.  It was exactly the same bird you would buy in a country butchers, but minus the lead shot! Butchers tend to ‘hang’ pheasants for about a week, so this was definitely fresher than those.  It was perfectly intact so I took it home, and prepared and ate it.  It was delicious and I derived a huge amount of pride and satisfaction from what I had done.  I was living in the country, but still felt like a ‘townie, and this simple act made me feel more in tune with where I was living.  I felt more akin with my environment.  And it was a free meal! Bonus!

Five years ago I began to learn and practice taxidermy using roadkill.  I was in contact with lots of dead animals and the same question kept popping up – why can’t I eat this?  In most cases the meat was inedible, or my lack of knowledge about the animal and any diseases it may carry prevented me from eating it.  Again, it seemed like such a waste!  This was an organic, free-range, pesticide-free, growth hormone-free and cruelty-free piece of meat – this is better than what you would buy in a supermarket!!  It was also something I hadn’t tried before and it had the element of the ‘exotic’.  I have always had an adventurous culinary curiosity and tried all sorts of street food in far-flung places around the world.

So I educated myself and began eating roadkill on a regular basis.

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Q.4 –  What is your opinion of pre-packaged meat?

When I see a tray of pre-packaged meat I often wonder how the animal had been fed, looked after, respected and finally slaughtered.  Did the animal suffer?  What has been pumped into it?  Is it full of antibiotics and growth hormones?  What food had it been eating?  Do I want this piece of meat in my body?

If I could afford it, I would only buy organic meat, always.  Ideally I would prefer to eat only animals that I had reared, slaughtered and prepared myself, and this is my long-term goal.  Unfortunately, I still have to rely on shops and supermarkets, and occasionally I buy the odd piece of meat that isn’t organic, especially if it looks very good and has been reduced heavily in price – better to eat it than see it go into the landfill.  It seems such a waste of a life.

I would not however buy ‘cheap’ anaemic looking pieces of flesh that have obviously been pumped full of water and synthetic additives to hide the fact that it was raised in battery conditions.

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Q.5 –  Have you ever found injured animals and had to dispatch them?

Occasionally I have had to do this with rabbits and pheasants at the side of the road, but luckily not very often.  I do not like to see animals suffer.  If I can not save its life, I will dispatch it and it always find it sad. I find it hypocritical if I am not able to do this, when I am more than willing to eat meat.  Your average carnivorous human would eat far less meat if they had to participate in the entire process from beginning to end, and that isn’t a bad thing, in my opinion, environmentally and ethically.

Just two days ago my partner found an injured owl.  It had a broken wing.  We called around and took it to a local vet.  They couldn’t save its wing, so had to put it down.  It was a huge shame and a beautiful bird.  We really wanted to save it.  We asked if we could have the bird for taxidermy reasons, but the vet said no.  The bird went to be incinerated.  What a waste!  We questioned if what we had done was the right thing.  We could have quickly and respectfully dispatched the bird ourselves had we known that the wing was not repairable and then we could have eaten it, and recycled the rest of it. Instead it was injected by humans with poisons in an artificially lit bright room.  It must have been afraid.

In most States in the USA, it is illegal to take roadkill, and often, by the time it is collected by the authorities, the meat is unfit for human consumption – What sort of ridiculous laws do we have in the West that allows good meat to go to waste, when there are so many undernourished people in our own countries, let alone in poorer countries?

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Q.6 –  What have you eaten, and is there any meat you wouldn’t eat?

I have eaten all meat that has been put before me that is fit for human consumption (Japan and the Far East in general is a great place to try out new and exotic foods and if the locals eat it, then I will.)  I will try most animals I have found dead if I am confident that it wouldn’t poison me.  (My only close shave was eating a dead penguin in Patagonia).  I travel extensively and to remote places – culinary experimentation is a passion of mine.  I have eaten many kinds of insects.  I like different textures and flavours.  I would not kill-to-eat someone’s domestic pet, but have probably been served it without my knowledge in various countries and accepted it graciously.  However, I would eat anything in a survival situation – including your grandma!  Lol.  I do not, and can not, eat Marmite though.

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Q.7 – Can you describe a normal days foraging?

Most finds are opportunistic, especially when they are animal.  I always have plastic bags, rubber gloves, a sharp knife or my ‘skinning kit’ in the back of the vehicle.  The places where certain fish, crustaceans, molluscs, plants or fungi are to be found, are often recommended by a friend or similar enthusiast. More often than not, these are closely guarded secrets!  On foraging trips such as these, I go deliberately and thoughtfully armed with what tools I need to collect and contain what I hope to find.  If  I were to plan a day’s hike that included opportunistic wild food foraging, I would first pick a scenic and interesting spot, armed with a plastic and paper bag (paper for fungi), a sharp knife, gloves, my mini pocket foraging books and a camera.  If my partner is with me and carrying a big backpack we will take the tent equipment, cooking apparatus and sleep and dine al-fresco.

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Q.8 –  Why not buy meat from a supermarket, or raise your own livestock?

As I mentioned before….

Unfortunately, at this time I cannot avoid having to shop at the supermarket and local farm shops and butchers, so do buy the occasional and preferably organic item from there.  I prefer not to encourage factory farming so I promote local farm shops and friends who grow their own to sell or barter.

Our long-term goal, and one we are actively researching, is to purchase a large plot of land, probably not in this country.  We plan to develop our own organic garden and vegetable patch and breed, raise, butcher and process our own livestock.  We plan to produce our own self sustainable energy, and be totally ‘off-grid’.  We hope to include like-minded people and those who want to learn all about self sustainability and living simply with nature.

On a political note:

Apart from this country’s weather, we don’t want to settle in this country as Central and Local Government clearly do not want to encourage this lifestyle, as they would not be able to take their 30-50% fee (in taxes) on our efforts – to fund their greedy, environmentally unfriendly and dangerous schemes of imperialism and manipulation and exploitation of us wage slaves and poorer countries.  (ooops, lol, bit of a rant there!!)   Most people who run our country, be they politicians or captains of industry are morally corrupt or just plain ignorant of their actions that are leading to the destruction of our planet and unnecessary suffering of millions of people around the world. I do not wish to support such people and so living off-grid in a country that will allow this lifestyle is our goal – and we wish to share this and support others around the world in similar ventures.

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Q.9 – What is your favourite roadkill recipe? 

I do not have a favourite as such; I love to experiment all the time.  If I were to choose a versatile dish that could accommodate any kind of meat no matter how small then it would have to be, ‘Chinese/ Japanese Dumplings’, ‘Terrine’ or a ‘Pate’.

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Q.10 – When did you first use roadkill in your art, and why?

I first used roadkill bird feathers to make a brooch when I was a child; I found them beautiful and wanted to recycle them. I felt an almost spiritual connection with that animal.  Later in life I discovered what shamanism and animism meant, so began to understand why I had always felt this way.

After a trip to Australia in 2001 I made a necklace from roadkill kangaroo claws.  Roadkill was all over the place in the outback – I had my partner at the time stop at the side of the road every time I saw a bleached white skeleton.  He thought I was mad sawing off the claws – he didn’t understand my art or curiosity with death.  I saw a rare resource and an opportunity to create something beautiful out of something that had passed away and was decomposing.  I see beauty in the whole cycle of life.  Death is so taboo in many societies and the fear of death makes it ugly.  I strongly disagree.  It can be a beautiful transformation, like the changing of the seasons.

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Q.11 – How does the public generally respond to your art?

Until recently I owned an art gallery in Harrogate that specialized in authentic Tribal artefacts and ethnographic curiosities.  The response from the public was mixed.  A lot of people didn’t understand it, but many had the nerve to come in and browse and ask questions.  They were snared by the stories of these beautiful and sometimes eerie looking objects and fetishes, which were anthropologically fascinating, tapping into the myth and magic of other cultures in remote far away places.  Kids especially loved it, and I went to schools with an armful of artefacts and taught a kind of ‘anthropology for kids’.  Afterwards, we would make masks and other tribal objects.

The gallery was a success, but unfortunately my relationship with my partner and co-owner was not and it closed down in 2007.

Whenever I have a studio to work from, I make sure that at times it is open to anyone curious enough to question what I do.  My last studio was in Wakefield, West Yorkshire.  Once every 2 months, me and the other artists in the building had an ‘Open Studio’ evening for members of the public.  My studio room (which I practically lived in) was quite different to everyone else’s and very weird to the uninitiated.  The walls were covered in old tribal masks and animal skins, pictures of female gladiators and goddesses, and scarified and tattooed faces.  I had a glass case full of interesting tribal jewelry from all over the world and an extensive specialized library.  There were taxidermy projects in progress on the tables and I was more than happy to explain and chat about anything they saw.

After meeting me and listening to my stories about how and why I think the way I do, they left my studio with a deeper respect for, and understanding of, the objects I transform

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These question & Answers were taken from an interview with http://www.takepart.com/article/2011/12/28/true-story-roadkill-cook

The True Story of the Roadkill Cook

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Yes, she eats animals killed by cars, but extreme forager Alison Brierley says her lifestyle is healthy—and good for the planet.
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Q.12 – TakePart: We have to know—how did you start eating roadkill?

Alison Brierley: I first ate a piece of roadkill when a car in front hit it about eight years ago on the way home from work. It just bounced off the car and it landed. I thought, “I’m going to check that.” When I went out, it was dead, luckily. I just thought, “I’m going to eat it. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. It’s exactly the same bird you’d get at the butcher’s minus all the lead shot.” So I took it home, prepared it, and it was fantastic. Then five years ago I started eating roadkill regularly and experimenting more and learning more of the taxidermy side of things for my artwork.

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Q.13 – TakePart: And what was that first animal?

Alison Brierley: A pheasant.

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Q.14 – TakePart: Who taught you to cook?

Alison Brierley: The cooking side of things I’ve just learned as I’ve gone along. As I’ve grown up I’ve really been interested in food and because I’m a meat eater I think it’s my responsibility to actually be acquainted with the animal I’m eating, which means butchering it and learning from scratch, instead of finding some sanitized package on the supermarket shelf already done for me.

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Q.15 – TakePart: Was there something that prompted you to start eating roadkill regularly?

Alison Brierley: Because I was using more animals in my artwork, I was handling a lot of meat, and what was going through my mind was, “Why can’t I eat this?” So when something was really fresh I actually decided to eat it. I learned about the animal first, like any diseases that it might carry. I got in touch with people who used to eat it themselves, asked them their opinions, and just gathered as much knowledge as I could before I actually started eating the roadkill. Before then, I just used to dispose of the carcasses to nature and keep the skins and feathers and whatever I was using [for my art], but now I try to go tip to tail. I try to eat and use everything.

Alison uses roadkill in her art too. Here, squirrel testicle earrings custom made for a bride.
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Q.16 – TakePart: What kind of roadkill have you eaten so far?

Alison Brierley: Staple roadkill in the U.K. are rabbits, pheasants, hares, deer, squirrels. Foxes, badgers, those kinds of things, I’ve processed and worked with, but their meat has never been in great enough condition to eat, which was a shame. Badgers especially can carry bovine TB, so you have to be very careful.  Occasionally, although illegal, farmers kill badgers with poisons and leave them at the side of the road to look like roadkill.

(Abroad is much trickier, due to different climates, but when it is cool and dry deer, kangaroo, rhea and penguin have been firm favourites!)

Q.17 – TakePart: You mention that you got advice from people who’ve eaten these animals themselves. Is there a community of people who eat roadkill?

Alison Brierley: There’s not quite a community. It’s still quite a quirky, eccentric thing to do because we’ve just been so socially conditioned that it’s dirty food. When people think of roadkill, they instantly think of this flat thing on the road that’s been run over 10 times by a tractor or something and that is totally inedible. Then people realize, “Hang on, what she’s preparing looks like it’s just gone to sleep—there’s hardly any injury on it whatsoever.” That’s the kind of roadkill that you look for, stuff that hasn’t been ruptured.

As far as friends go, we do have a community of people who love to go camping and be outdoors in nature, and that’s where you tend to skill share and find out a lot about country ways and cookery, like cooking whole pigs in earth ovens.

(Just recently I took part in a programme filmed by Beyond Productions’.  I gathered an elite group of foragers, hunters and craftsmen and women, all familiar with roadkill in one form or another.  The list of Roadkill Collaborators id here

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Q.17 – TakePart: I heard that you’re a nomad, is that true?

Alison Brierley: Me and my partner are both nomadic. We’ve been traveling for a long time. The last time I had a permanent home was five years ago. I owned an art gallery in Harrogate. It was very normal, apart from that it was all to do with tribal art. Me and my partner are both avid backpackers, so we do a lot of traveling into remote places like the Amazon and Papua New Guinea. We stay with tribes. I’ve got a keen interest in anthropology and I just love different cultures and how they cook and what they eat and their relationship to their food as well.

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Q.18 – TakePart: Is that how your interest in foraging, recycling and ecology grew?

Alison Brierley: Yeah. I think when you’re traveling and you don’t have a lot of possessions and you’re not surrounded by bills and house and possessions and clutter, you have more of a chance to interact with the environment. So we’ve decided to stay nomadic until we find a piece of land where we actually want to put down roots and build an eco-home and start a small community of our own, where like-minded people can come and skill share and learn off the land. That’s the plan—to be totally off-grid and eco.

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Q.19 – TakePart: Right now are you staying with friends or camping?

Alison Brierley: We have a motorhome, so we actually live in our motorhome and we drive it wherever we like. If we don’t like the view one morning, we can change it. It’s quite nice. When we visit friends, we take our house with us. We love it. It’s a great lifestyle. It suits us very, very much. Although, we will be renting in a beautiful little village up on the moors in Yorkshire to have a baby and nest-build for a little while.

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Q.20 – TakePart: What’s your favorite roadkill to cook?

Alison Brierley: I love eating hare. Hare is very special to me. Pheasant is a staple food. We eat lots of pheasants and lots of rabbits in springtime [laughing]. There are sort of seasons for different types of roadkill, and my fellow loves venison. We actually both love venison because you can get a huge amount of meat off one animal and it lasts for ages, but my favourite delicacy is the really weird stuff, like insects and the stuff you get in foreign countries that nobody else dares to try. I like to shock myself.

Q.21 – TakePart: What’s the most shocking insect you’ve eaten?

Alison Brierley: A live bamboo worm. It popped in my mouth and it was just like a big sack of milk, and that kind of freaked me out. But it didn’t taste bad at all.

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Q.22 – TakePart: What’s your least favorite food?

Alison Brierley: There’s only one thing I really dislike. I can eat anything apart from Marmite. I hate Marmite, and Vegemite as well. I keep trying it, thinking “This is the only thing I don’t like, so I’m going to keep trying it.” And I still really don’t like it.

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Last but not least…

Q.23 – What is the law on taking roadkill?

Finally, a few quick notes about the law…. but I am no expert, so check yourself if you really need to know specifics.  Generally, the UK is pretty good at allowing folk to dine from the road.

I would be wary of eating badger from the road at the moment…. farmers who view protected badgers as pests are putting poisoned animals by the roadside to make them ‘look’ like roadkill… so be warned.  I am not touching badgers for a while.

“The ownership of wild game is determined by where it dies and not who bred it or released it. For example, a pheasant killed on a public road cannot be claimed by anyone, nor can anyone be prosecuted for claiming it. The rumour about picking up a bird that has been killed by the car in front was an explanation as to how to kill a pheasant and not be charged with trespass in pursuit of game. As the bird died in a public place a charge of trespass cannot be brought to bare”.

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(The following is borrowed from a thread on a forum about the roadkill law in the UK which I think is really useful)

“Wild animals aren’t classified as ‘owned’ unless they’re specifically being farmed, in which case they need to be on land secured by fencing, so you’d not be likely to hit them.

However, you have a limited sense of ‘ownership’ to wild animals while they happen to be on your land – thus if you wander onto an estate and kill one, that’s theft/poaching, but if it leaves the estate of its own free will and wanders onto a road, then it becomes property of the owner of that land – i.e the roads department.

Legally, you could now be prosecuted for theft by the roads dept, but since they don’t generally mind folk tidying the roads for free, they probably never would.

The ‘don’t take it if you hit it’ rule comes about from the explicit offence of ‘driving deer’ with a motorised vehicle – i.e chasing/killing deer with a motor vehicle is automatically an offence unless express permission has been sought from the land owner.

So, legally you are likely to be ok to take anything you hit (apart from deer, or protected animals like badgers), if you seek permission from the roads department to take their property away.

However, the one major issue in all of this is that only people holding public liability insurance are allowed to deliberately kill animals on public highways, in case they get it wrong and the injured animal runs under /another/ car and injures the passengers.  Thus you’re definitely breaking the law if you find an injured deer in the middle of the road, and decide to dispatch it.  You /could/ drag it onto private land next to the road and dispatch it there, but then of course you’re killing an animal on private land without the owners consent which is poaching!

For the specifics on deer, see:

Deer Act 1991 (England & Wales)

Deer (Scotland) Act 1996 (Scotland)

Humane Dispatch –  Deer-Vehicle Collisions (UK Government Guidelines)

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“YUMMY MUMMY” 

My Experimental Adventures Lacto Fermenting Using Raw Breast Milk

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First step, seperated breast milk into curds and whey

- “MAMA MOOLI” -

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nourishing-traditions I had been trawling the web for ages looking for a local raw milk supplier so I can start lacto-fermenting foods.  We had recently bought the book ‘Nourishing Traditions’ and I had been building up courage to experiment with lacto-fermented vegetables, cultured dairy products and fermented beverages like kombucha.

To begin I ideally needed to make “WHEY” – as in ‘Curds and Whey‘.

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Finding good RAW mlk turned out to be quite a challenge as there are many laws regarding the selling and comsuming of unpasteurised milk.  A lot of the information out there is trying to convince you that drinking raw milk was DANGEROUS!

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We did the research.

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The benefits, in my humble opinion far outweigh the risks.  So I kept looking for a local supplier, preferably of organic ‘Goat’ milk.

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Then a penny dropped… “DING!”… “what the feck, Derrrrr!!”

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surprised goat

We have a live organic goat living with us already… ME!!!

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Why didn’t I think of it before?  Was it simply because of the cultural conditioning  and belief that drinking your own breast milk is a bit, well, “Eeeeeewwe” ???

Really?  My god!  It is barmy when you think about it.  Human milk is designed for us, but we drink, and feed our new-borns and children, milk from another ‘species’, often rather than our own!!!  A species that is factory farmed, sometmes in terrible conditions, regularly pumped full of growth hormones, antibiotics and fed pesticide enriched food stuffs?  And THAT is totally socially acceptable?  How weird is that?  “Eeeeeewwe”!

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Well, MY milk tastes bloody yummily lovely thank you very much, lol, and it is clean, chock full of antibodies and completely free!

That was it.  Didn’t need any convincing.  Time to get pumping!

 “MOOOOOOooooooooooo”

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happy mad cow

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Soooo, I started pumping!!! … and pumping!!!

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Unfortunatly me and the pump… we don’t like each other (long story) so didn’t get much out.  Thanks to copious amounts of Green & Blacks chocolate I eventually got a few fluid ounces out.

It was enough however to make my first jar of lacto fermented “MAMMA MOOLI” using my own milk!  And it was great, Yayyyyy!!

 (if a little salty… I used too much salt)

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The process was the same as the one laid out in the book for normal fermentation using whey and I will provide a link here  to the recipes rather than type the whole thing out (busy mum needs to find short cuts and solutions, lol)

I hope the pics are enough of a visual guide and I am happy to anwswer any questions personally using the comment boxes provided with this post.

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Since originally drafying this page ages ago I have weaned my little one.

I could have happily extended the breast feeding, but my partner and I are trying for another.  At 44 years old I need to maximise my chances.

Sadly, breast feeding is one of those things that can inhibit conceiving.  The process of weaning was (sometimes still is) actually harder for me than it was for him.  I still get a little emotional at times, my hormones are taking an entire cycle, at least, to return to normal.  I am content that our little ‘Mooster’ was given the very best start in life and had his ‘booby’ for a good 18 months.

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However…. the story does not stop there!

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One of my dear lactating friends, Eirene, upon much encouragement by me, has begun pumping for the Milk Bank.  How fantastic is that!!

She is now a breast milk donor for the poor little premature babies who do not get the chance others get.  She has an abundance of rich, nourishing and much needed milk, and now she saves lives!  I am so proud of her.

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Caitlin, another breast milk donor fed my little one when things got tough for me at one point in the early days.  I saw her personally at her home and was lucky enough to get her milk ‘raw’ and unpasteurized.  She even wet-nursed my baby, which was a huge experience for both of us.  We are quite close now, a bond was formed between us that can never be broken.

Eventually I pumped my milk back and continued to feed my baby for another 15 months,

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Soooo, Eirene with regularity has a freezer full of bags of lovely milk.

All the milk that the bank cannot take, she is giving me… so my lacto fermenting veggie adventures using breast milk continue…. Yaayyyyyyyyyy!!!!

….but using someone else’s milk…. lol.

Now that raises another eyebrow doesn’t it!!

raised eyebrow baby

………………..O………………..

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As with a lot of my work, I aspire to gently push the viewer, including myself, to question preconceptions and socio-cultural taboos by creating something beautiful and compelling from something dead and/or socially repulsive.

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Feel free to explore my site and other posts such as…

 “PREOCCUPIED with PLACENTAS”

 “Even before I became pregnant, I knew that I would do something special with it”

12 Experimental Adventures Making Beautiful Things from Placenta

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Other blogs on ART projects -

SHAMANIC ROADKILL CAPE, PLACENTA  ART & COOKERY, PLACENTA BOOTIES,  PLACENTA DISCO-BOOTIES, SHAMANIC SHAKTI BEAVER MERKIN, ANTI  BADGER-CULL TRIP-TIC, ROADKILL SQUIRREL TESTICLE EARRINGS  , BURNING-MAN ASARO MUD-FAMILY PERFORMANCE ART &  JAPANESE WISHING TREE

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A Wild Woman’s Joy at being able to DANCE again

after pelvic injury and birthing.

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tumbleweed-at-the-edge-of-a-sand-road-on-the-way-to-route-40-argentina

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“We Have Come To Be Danced”

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The year before I became pregnant I had a slight injury to my hip whilst out hiking in beautiful countryside.

Wasn’t that much of an injury I thought, but things got worse over the coming months, and, convinced that I had somehow manifested it myself and that my body would heal naturally, I did nothing about it.  In fact it took ages to relate the two together.  I continued to dance, despite the discomfort!

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Nine months after the injury I realised that hoping it would get better on its own was futile and I sought the help of a physiotherapist who confirmed that my pelvis had had an anterior rotation for sometime – no wonder I had been in considerable pain.  My pelvic floor had deteriorated and various muscles were not firing as they should.  Other muscles had taken over, my body was way out of balance and it needed much work, as did my self-esteem.  I was relieved to begin physical treatment.  It was an education to learn just how important it was to maintain flexibility and good posture.  For someone who was an enthusiastic dancer and considered herself pretty fit, I was shocked to lose my strength and mobility so quickly!

Only weeks after starting said treatment I found out (thanks to the ‘Cosmic Sock Monkey’, lol) that I was at last pregnant!  Whooohoooo!!  I was soooo happy!  We had been trying for so long!

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Unfortunately the NHS do not treat pregnant women, so my condition was left to deteriorate again until after the birth.  It got much, much worse.  I no longer danced.

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I still continued to enjoy life, we even bought a van in the States and did a huge road trip which included the iconic BURNING MAN festival, albeit at a more sedentary pace and constantly consciously aware of the unique little person growing inside me.

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We did everything we could to make his entrance into this world as easy, enjoyable and enlightening as possible.  We did a lot of reading together. We even moved areas to one that was less inclined to suggest elective caesareans and not be so fearful and protocol based.  I was thrilled to be so fecund, I was going to miss this feeling.

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Natural Birthing, Rites of Passage & Primal Behaviour.

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However, at the age of 42 pregnancy knocked the stuffing out of my body, despite being enchanted by my pregnancy.  I was finding it excruciating to walk, sit and sleep.  I found an amazing chiropractor who helped keep everything together while my body was flooded with the hormone ‘relaxin‘.  This hormone was not helping me stabilise my twisted, and now floppy pelvis.

Bernette Van Kal based in Harrogate at Montpellier Chiropractic, North Yorkshire is a miracle worker, was incredibly gentle and reassuring.  She continued to realign my body so that we could have the birth we wanted.

I can not thank Bernette enough, she has since become a close and cherished friend, and I managed to have a wonderful home-birth and beautiful son, Maximus.

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H1730011

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After being semi-disabled for nearly two years, I can at last dance (for a while) without pain.  I have made up for the lack of self-expression through movement by focusing on my other artistic practices.

Now, the worry and challenge of losing my mobility and being uncertain of its return has transformed how I want to move my body, especially in public – basically, I didn’t give much of a feck before, I care even less now what other people think.

I still have some degree of discomfort every day, I keep popping out little abdominal hernias because it has taken 18 months for the stomach muscles to knit back together, but my continued Pilates classes twice a week with the lovely and whip cracking Claire and Louise  (of Heaven & Hell Fitness) and the physiotherapy exercises are improving my level of fitness and stability all the time.

Eckart Tolle helps me to see the bigger picture and keeps me mentally on track in an insane world, and David Deida’s daily ‘Bluetruths’ remind me how to keep the flame in our relationship and sex-life burning.

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I can’t wait to be dancing again this summer… and jumping up and down without peeing myself!  lol.

This powerful poem that I love by Jewel Mathieson sums up how I feel.  Every woman would benefit from …

I HAVE COME TO DANCE!!

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We have come to Be Danced

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Not the pretty dance
 Not the pretty pretty, pick me, pick me dance
But the claw our way back into the Belly
Of the Sacred, Sensual Animal dance
The unhinged, unplugged, cat is out of its box Dance
The holding the precious moment in the palms
Of our hands and feet Dance

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We have come to Be Danced
Not the jiffy booby, shake your booty for him dance
 But the wring the sadness from our skin dance
The Blow the chip off our shoulder Dance.
The slap the apology from our posture Dance

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We have come to Be Danced
Not the monkey see, monkey do dance
One two Dance like you
 One two three, Dance like me Dance
but the grave robber, tomb stalker
Tearing scabs and scars open Dance
The rub the Rhythm Raw against our Soul Dance

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We have come to Be Danced
Not the nice, invisible, self-conscious shuffle
But the matted hair flying, Voodoo Mama
Shaman Shakin’ Ancient Bones Dance
The strip us from our casings, Return our Wings
Sharpen our Claws and Tongues Dance
The Shed Dead Cells and slip into
The Luminous Skin of Love Dance.

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We have Come to Be Danced
Not the hold our breath wallow in the shallow end of the floor dance
But the Meeting of the Trinity, the Body Breath and Beat Dance
The Shout Hallelujah from the top of our Thighs Dance
The Mother may I?
Yes you may take 10 giant Leaps Dance
 The olly olly oxen free free free Dance
The everyone can come to our Heaven Dance

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We have come to Be Danced
Where the Kingdom’s Collide
In the Cathedral of Flesh
To Burn Back into the Light
To unravel, to Play, to Fly, to Pray
To root in skin sanctuary
We have come to Be Danced

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We Have Come..

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~ by Jewel Mathieson.

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………………..O………………..

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As with a lot of my work, I aspire to gently push the viewer, including myself, to question preconceptions and socio-cultural taboos by creating something beautiful and compelling from something dead and/or socially repulsive.

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Look out for blogs on my other ART projects – SHAMANIC ROADKILL CAPE, PLACENTA  ART & COOKERY, PLACENTA BOOTIES,  PLACENTA DISCO-BOOTIES, SHAMANIC SHAKTI BEAVER MERKIN, ANTI  BADGER-CULL TRIP-TIC, ROADKILL SQUIRREL TESTICLE EARRINGS  , BURNING-MAN ASARO MUD-FAMILY PERFORMANCE ART &  JAPANESE WISHING TREE

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