Category: Road Kill


Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’! – Part 4

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

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Appreciation...

Appreciation…

Making the most of skin and feathers.

I always think it is a great shame not to use all of an animal that I find whilst foraging.  I have in the past and still to this day create some stunningly beautiful and compelling art work from dead things.  But where do you start?  How do you preserve a bird (or animal) skin for future use?  This short 7 minute film in the “Roadkill” series shows you how….

“Taxidermy in the Woodlands”

In this film I show you how to skin and preserve in a very basic way (using just salt) a bird in the feather.  This film features three birds; a blackbird, a magpie and a pheasant.

To see a close up image and blog about the Shamanic Roadkill Pheasant Cape click here!

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Last year I made these “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015.

.

The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

To see the other episodes in this series follow the links below…

.

Capture plucking the pigeon woodland tv part b2

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Part 1: Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands

Part 2: Preparing Roadkill Pigeon for by the Woodlands

Part 3: Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands

Part 4: Taxidermy in the Woodlands

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*******************

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media. Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors. These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

.

*******************

REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it? If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try. If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards! Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today. Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

.

DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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.

Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’! – Part 3

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

.

“Wild Wood-Pigeon Breast with Wild Blackberry Sauce and Wild Boletus infused Moroccan Cous-Cous”

.

.

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015.

This week the latest 5 minute follow-up film emerged  – PART 3

.

Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands”

.

The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

.

To see PART 2

“Preparing Roadkill Pigeon to eat in the Woodlands”

Click here!

.

Capture plucking the pigeon woodland tv part b2

*******************

.

Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media. Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors. These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

.

*******************

REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it? If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try. If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards! Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today. Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

.

DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

.

Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

.

Capture roadkill for woodlands tv part 1.JPG2 .

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015 and today the latest short follow-up film emerged entitled: Part 2 –

“Preparing Roadkill Pigeon to eat in the Woodlands”

.

Click here to see the 4.30 minute film

Preparing:

“Wild Wood-Pigeon Breast with Wild Blackberry Sauce and Wild Mushroom Cous-Cous”

.

The actual cooking of the dish is covered in the next short film aired on the 15th June 2015.

.

“Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands”

.

.

The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

*******************

.

Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media.

Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors.

These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

.

*******************

REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

.

DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

.

Making movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identification” aired today (15th April 2015) and short follow-up films about woodland cookery, skinning, preparation and preservation will emerge on the 15th of each month till August/ September 2015.

.

Click here to see the 7 minute film or on the image below!

woodlands tv title shot.

The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often Vegetarian friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an ‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

.

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

Thanks to Claudia Nye we now have the VISUAL version!

.

claudia nye mugshotOriginally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media.

Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors.

These movies are for woodlands_TV

Will post the links ‘as and when’. X

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 ***************

The Original BLOG….

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

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Is it still fresh?

What most people visualise when they think of roadkill.

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“Health and Culinary you say? In the same sentence as Roadkill???   Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!”…. but seriously, you will be surprised at how healthy roadkill can be.

 .

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

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I asked some “wordsmithy” friends if they wanted to help me to create a  humourous mnemonic.  Mnemonics are memory devices that help learners recall larger pieces of information, especially in the form of lists like characteristics, steps, stages, parts, phases, etc.  For the list I had in mind this was the perfect tool.

My dear old friend Mark “BUZZ” Busby did me, and all you fellow “Splatter Spotters”, very proud indeed with this…

Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

Thank You Buzz!  You’re a genius! 

.

Soooo!  That is the quick and easy way to remember the essential pointers:

‘Damage’, ‘Eyes’, ‘Fleas & Flies’, ‘Rigor Mortis’, ‘Skin’, ‘Blood’, ‘Law’, ‘Diseases’, Smell’ and last but not least ‘Climate & Cooking’.

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Damage

roadkill20n-1-webAvoid animals that have been badly damaged or ruptured internally.  Check the animal carefully before stuffing it in the boot of the car (gloves are recommended and a plastic bag or tarp).  If you saw the accident happen then you know it is definitely fresh.  If you didn’t, only pick up those that have ‘bounced’ from being hit cleanly once, preferably to the side of the road, and with someone else’s car, lol.  Obviously, don’t pick up something that’s been run over a couple or ten times, looks sick or abnormal!!

Eyes

black rabbit eyeWhat do the eyes look like?  Are there any eyes at all?

Carrion birds arrive at the scene of a road traffic accident quickly and especially first thing in the morning.  Eyes are soft, succulent and easy to pluck!  If there is still an eye left on the underside check  it to see if it is still clear.  Cloudy eyes can indicate that it isn’t fresh anymore.

 

Fleas & Flies

flies on foxThis is easy to remember – “FLEAS GOOD!  FLIES BAD!”.  Living & active fleas are a good sign of freshness – fleas will soon evacuate a cold dead body.  If you feel squeamish about fleas a 24 hour spell in the deep freeze will finish them off.

Flies will find a carcass quickly, especially in warm weather.  You may find tiny clusters of fresh long, white, oblong shaped eggs around the eyes, mouth, or other orifices.  This is not so bad if you don’t intend to eat these bits and the eggs have only just been laid.  If you are not sure about this or anything else mentioned so far, leave it be.

Do do not pick anything up that is old enough to be crawling with beetles, maggots or other larvae.  be wary of ticks that may carry Lymes Disease.  Contain ticks on a deer carcass whilst in the car using a sheet or plastic tarp.

 

Rigor Mortis

rigor mortisA stiff animal could just be in Rigor which means it’s still fresh, but keep in mind the previous tips when judging time of death.

The rate at which Rigor Mortis sets in will depend on several factors such as the animals physique, cause of death and the climate.  Different sources give different figures, but very broadly and in ‘average’ circumstances with roadkill it begins from 1/2 hr (bird) – 24 hrs (deer).   It becomes complete in about 12 hours or more.

Then the body relaxes again, this time as a result of decomposition. This is known as resolution of rigor.  The stiffness in the muscle tissues begins to decrease owing to the enzymatic breakdown of collagen that hold muscle fibers together. This phenomenon is also referred to as “Aging of Meat”.  This aging effect produces meats that are more tender and palatable, hence the ‘hanging of game’!

 

Skin

Rabbit-FurDoes the skin have fur or feathers attached to it?  Give fur a gentle tug to see if it is still firmly rooted in the skin.  You don’t want chunks of hair falling out easily.   Alopecia could be a sure sign that the carcass is too old or that the animal was suffering from a disease.

The skin will move freely across the muscles if the carcass is fresh.  Black or purple marks can indicate where the animal has been hit, these are okay, but you may want to cut the severely bruised bits of meat away before cooking.

 

Blood

roadkill badgerThere shouldn’t be that much blood on a carcass suitable for eating.  A bloody mouth or nose is fairly normal.

Ideally any blood needs to be fresh, wet and bright red.  Blood or no, you should use gloves to handle dead animals, you still have to get back in the car and touch the steering wheel, your passengers, packed lunch, etc.  Always keep a stash of wet wipes handy!

 

Law

The-LawGenerally, the UK is pretty good at allowing folk to dine from the road.  Farmed animals like sheep and pigs belong to someone so they should be reported.  Wild animals aren’t classified as ‘owned’ unless they’re specifically being farmed, in which case they need to be on land secured by fencing, so you’d not be likely to hit them.  If found on the road they are “Fair Game”.  Domestic animals like cats and dogs should also be reported.

I am no expert on the laws of other countries, so check yourself if you really need to know specifics.

 

Diseases

Tuberculosis-virusDo Your “Zoonotic” Disease Homework!  It is essential to research the kinds of diseases certain wild animals can catch or carry and what signs to look for.  Very rarely do they transfer to humans if proper procedures are followed.  Avoid giving anything you are NOT unquestionably sure about to YOUNG CHILDREN, the ENFEEBLED or PREGNANT WOMEN, just to be on the safe side.

Cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically all nasties!  That includes ToxoplasmosisBovine TB, Myxomatosis and even Rabies!!

I would be wary of eating badger from the road at the moment…. farmers who view badgers as health threats are putting their poisoned animals by the roadside to make them ‘look’ like roadkill… so be warned.  I am not touching badgers for a while.

 

Smell

sniffing the deadListen to your nose… if it smells rotten, don’t take it!

You can tell a lot by smell before you start to butcher.  Smell and flavour in all meat is a combination of age, exercise, species, breed and diet.  Wild animal meat can smell quite strong and ‘gamey’.

Fat is also the home of any weird or odd smell you might find in wild game; and because of its unsaturated nature also meas it goes rancid faster.   Don’t ditch good wild fat though, it is very high in important vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids.

The varied diet of a game animal means that any fat-soluble ester or terpene or other flavour molecule that critter has metabolized will end up on your dinner plate.

If it smells okay on the outside but when you open it up it smells much more than just gamey don’t eat it.  Intestines have their own unique scent which you get used to and can judge accordingly.  Mild gas, urine and a bit of poop may be normal too, so use your instincts on all this until experience tells you otherwise.

Male animals in rutting season can be very ‘musky’ and not palatable.  No surprise there!  lol.

 

Climate & Cooking

snow roadkill deer warningCold and dry climates are better for freshness; nature makes a great fridge and freezer sometimes.  Be careful in warm and hot weather – bugs find the dead quickly and meat spoils easily.

Consider how long the animal will be stored in a warm vehicle after you have claimed it.  Use the cooler parts of the car, for example NOT in the passenger foot-well with the floor heater on full.  I have put a small animal in a plastic bag before now and secured it tightly on the outside of a wound-up window!  Looked weird but it worked wonderfully!

When you get to your final destination prepare or preserve your carcass ASAP.

As mentioned earlier, cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically everything!

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As you can see, you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s not rocket science!! 

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

.

DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

.

The ‘MUNCHIES’ Food Channel Presents:

 THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR

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Capture - Roadkill Connoisseur - Flesh is flesh

cooking…

Southern Fried Squirrel”

& “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

IMG_1042A ‘How to’ film for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

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I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show is pretty funny, lol.

 

Click on the recipe titles for ingredients and methods.  if the link doesn’t work yet it is because the post is still under construction!

Save this page and I will update ASAP.

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Southern Fried Squirrel”

&

“Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

 

freemantlemedia uk

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Orientation Travel Productions and Dutch host Thomas Acda go on a “Roadkill Road Trip” around North Yorkshire with yours truly!

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orientationSpent a wonderfully full day on a warm and sunny Summer Solstice filming a pilot episode with the Orientation Production team of five wonderfully funny folk from the Netherlands.

The host, Thomas Acda, is a well known rock star, song writer, actor and comedian.  He is making a series very similar to that of Anthony Bourdain; traveling the world, meeting new and interesting people and having epiphanies through culinary experiences.

The day was spent foraging, exploring the beautiful countryside, looking for roadkill, cooking it, chatting and having a fun time.  We ended around a camp fire with some fantastic friends/ local musicians.  We certainly showed them some good old Yorkshire hospitality.

Sorry, not allowed to post anything else until the program is aired on mainstream Dutch TV this year.  Will post links ASAP.

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*******************

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Making a “How To…” film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel!

.

IMG_1042“How To Cook Roadkill” for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Stickers Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show promises to be pretty funny, lol.

It should be ready to view online in a few months with a working title of “From Tarmac to Table!”.

freemantlemedia ukCan’t disclose anything else because it hasn’t aired yet but will post the link ASAP. X

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*******************

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DISCLAIMER… Before I start I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

Is it still fresh?

What most people visualise when they think of roadkill.

.

I get asked many questions, one of the most common is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an “Easy to Remember” ROAD-SIDE ROAD-KILL HEALTH & SAFETY CULINARY CHECKLIST! 

.

Okay, at this point there may be some eyebrow twitching or full-on belly laughs…. “Health and Culinary you say? In the same sentence as Roadkill???   Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!”…. but seriously, you will be surprised at how healthy roadkill can be.

Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often Vegetarian friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals.

.

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

.

I asked some “wordsmithy” friends if they wanted to help me to create a  humourous mnemonic.  Mnemonics are memory devices that help learners recall larger pieces of information, especially in the form of lists like characteristics, steps, stages, parts, phases, etc.  For the list I had in mind this was the perfect tool.

My dear old friend Mark “BUZZ” Busby did me, and all you fellow “Splatter Spotters”, very proud indeed with this…

Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

Thank You Buzz!  You’re a genius! 

.

Soooo!  That is the quick and easy way to remember the essential pointers:

‘Damage’, ‘Eyes’, ‘Fleas & Flies’, ‘Rigor Mortis’, ‘Skin’, ‘Blood’, ‘Law’, ‘Diseases’, Smell’ and last but not least ‘Climate & Cooking’.

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Damage

roadkill20n-1-webAvoid animals that have been badly damaged or ruptured internally.  Check the animal carefully before stuffing it in the boot of the car (gloves are recommended and a plastic bag or tarp).  If you saw the accident happen then you know it is definitely fresh.  If you didn’t, only pick up those that have ‘bounced’ from being hit cleanly once, preferably to the side of the road, and with someone else’s car, lol.  Obviously, don’t pick up something that’s been run over a couple or ten times, looks sick or abnormal!!

Eyes

black rabbit eyeWhat do the eyes look like?  Are there any eyes at all?

Carrion birds arrive at the scene of a road traffic accident quickly and especially first thing in the morning.  Eyes are soft, succulent and easy to pluck!  If there is still an eye left on the underside check  it to see if it is still clear.  Cloudy eyes can indicate that it isn’t fresh anymore.

 

Fleas & Flies

flies on foxThis is easy to remember – “FLEAS GOOD!  FLIES BAD!”.  Living & active fleas are a good sign of freshness – fleas will soon evacuate a cold dead body.  If you feel squeamish about fleas a 24 hour spell in the deep freeze will finish them off.

Flies will find a carcass quickly, especially in warm weather.  You may find tiny clusters of fresh long, white, oblong shaped eggs around the eyes, mouth, or other orifices.  This is not so bad if you don’t intend to eat these bits and the eggs have only just been laid.  If you are not sure about this or anything else mentioned so far, leave it be.

Do do not pick anything up that is old enough to be crawling with beetles, maggots or other larvae.  be wary of ticks that may carry Lymes Disease.  Contain ticks on a deer carcass whilst in the car using a sheet or plastic tarp.

 

Rigor Mortis

rigor mortisA stiff animal could just be in Rigor which means it’s still fresh, but keep in mind the previous tips when judging time of death.

The rate at which Rigor Mortis sets in will depend on several factors such as the animals physique, cause of death and the climate.  Different sources give different figures, but very broadly and in ‘average’ circumstances with roadkill it begins from 1/2 hr (bird) – 24 hrs (deer).   It becomes complete in about 12 hours or more.

Then the body relaxes again, this time as a result of decomposition. This is known as resolution of rigor.  The stiffness in the muscle tissues begins to decrease owing to the enzymatic breakdown of collagen that hold muscle fibers together. This phenomenon is also referred to as “Aging of Meat”.  This aging effect produces meats that are more tender and palatable, hence the ‘hanging of game’!

 

Skin

Rabbit-FurDoes the skin have fur or feathers attached to it?  Give fur a gentle tug to see if it is still firmly rooted in the skin.  You don’t want chunks of hair falling out easily.   Alopecia could be a sure sign that the carcass is too old or that the animal was suffering from a disease.

The skin will move freely across the muscles if the carcass is fresh.  Black or purple marks can indicate where the animal has been hit, these are okay, but you may want to cut the severely bruised bits of meat away before cooking.

 

Blood

roadkill badgerThere shouldn’t be that much blood on a carcass suitable for eating.  A bloody mouth or nose is fairly normal.

Ideally any blood needs to be fresh, wet and bright red.  Blood or no, you should use gloves to handle dead animals, you still have to get back in the car and touch the steering wheel, your passengers, packed lunch, etc.  Always keep a stash of wet wipes handy!

 

Law

The-LawGenerally, the UK is pretty good at allowing folk to dine from the road.  Farmed animals like sheep and pigs belong to someone so they should be reported.  Wild animals aren’t classified as ‘owned’ unless they’re specifically being farmed, in which case they need to be on land secured by fencing, so you’d not be likely to hit them.  If found on the road they are “Fair Game”.  Domestic animals like cats and dogs should also be reported.

I am no expert on the laws of other countries, so check yourself if you really need to know specifics.

 

Diseases

Tuberculosis-virusDo Your “Zoonotic” Disease Homework!  It is essential to research the kinds of diseases certain wild animals can catch or carry and what signs to look for.  Very rarely do they transfer to humans if proper procedures are followed.  Avoid giving anything you are NOT unquestionably sure about to YOUNG CHILDREN, the ENFEEBLED or PREGNANT WOMEN, just to be on the safe side.

Cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically all nasties!  That includes ToxoplasmosisBovine TB, Myxomatosis and even Rabies!!

I would be wary of eating badger from the road at the moment…. farmers who view badgers as health threats are putting their poisoned animals by the roadside to make them ‘look’ like roadkill… so be warned.  I am not touching badgers for a while.

 

Smell

sniffing the deadListen to your nose… if it smells rotten, don’t take it!

You can tell a lot by smell before you start to butcher.  Smell and flavour in all meat is a combination of age, exercise, species, breed and diet.  Wild animal meat can smell quite strong and ‘gamey’.

Fat is also the home of any weird or odd smell you might find in wild game; and because of its unsaturated nature also meas it goes rancid faster.   Don’t ditch good wild fat though, it is very high in important vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids.

The varied diet of a game animal means that any fat-soluble ester or terpene or other flavour molecule that critter has metabolized will end up on your dinner plate.

If it smells okay on the outside but when you open it up it smells much more than just gamey don’t eat it.  Intestines have their own unique scent which you get used to and can judge accordingly.  Mild gas, urine and a bit of poop may be normal too, so use your instincts on all this until experience tells you otherwise.

Male animals in rutting season can be very ‘musky’ and not palatable.  No surprise there!  lol.

 

Climate & Cooking

snow roadkill deer warningCold and dry climates are better for freshness; nature makes a great fridge and freezer sometimes.  Be careful in warm and hot weather – bugs find the dead quickly and meat spoils easily.

Consider how long the animal will be stored in a warm vehicle after you have claimed it.  Use the cooler parts of the car, for example NOT in the passenger foot-well with the floor heater on full.  I have put a small animal in a plastic bag before now and secured it tightly on the outside of a wound-up window!  Looked weird but it worked wonderfully!

When you get to your final destination prepare or preserve your carcass ASAP.

As mentioned earlier, cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically everything!

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As you can see, you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s not rocket science!! 

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

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close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

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Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

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oh deer

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To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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TB – “TOTAL BOLLOCKS!” – My Rant on the Plan to Unnecessarily Cull British Badgers.

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TUFTY-TASTIC “Red” Squirrel Sausages – Casting lessons from the “Roadkill-Sausage Queen”.

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TB – “TOTAL BOLLOCKS”

ROADKILL BADGER TALISMAN 

(Supporting the Anti Badger-Cull Campaign)

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 'TOTAL BOLLOCKS' - ROADKILL BADGER TALISMAN - ANTI BADGER-CULL CAMPAIGN

TB –  ‘TOTAL BOLLOCKS’ – ROADKILL BADGER TALISMAN – ANTI BADGER-CULL CAMPAIGN

Made from recycled materials and a roadkill badger.

(Completed 2009)

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“When the badger comes into our lives it is time to get busy with projects, speak up and ask for help if we need it in our lives. The badger is also a sign that it is time for us come out of hiding – it’s time for us to let the world know we are here, and we mean business!”

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TB

(Total Bollocks)

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My rant on The Plan to cull all the badgers – to be continued….

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My feelings have been expressed in my upcoming badger taxidermy art projects entitled:

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*  TB – Total Bollocks!!!

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'TOTAL BOLLOCKS' - ROADKILL BADGER TALISMAN - ANTI BADGER-CULL CAMPAIGN

(2009)

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*  How to Really Bag a Badger!

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How to really bag a badger.

(2009 – present)

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&

*  A Better Solution Please

(2009- present)

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This post is incomplete as yet, I will finish the wordy bit and re-post when I have the spare time.

 

“From Bitumen to Banquet”

Wild Food and Roadkill Preparation and Preservation Workshops
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I am a Roadkill Recycler, Cook and Wild Food Forager. 
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I often hold workshops at camps and small festivals teaching the joys of Roadkill Preparation and Preservation. I also give private tuition and present on cookery “How to…” short films, consult for TV, radio and other media producers.
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I AM AVAILABLE TO FACILITATE AND TAILOR INDIVIDUAL WORKSHOPS AND DEMONSTRATIONS UPON REQUEST
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I love what I do.
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I am a very happy scavenger and I dislike waste.
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true story of a roadkill cook
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Wild Meat!

“It always amazes me how squeamish your average carnivore is!”

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“The interest in eating wild food which includes ‘accidental meat’ as a healthy supplementary food source is becoming increasing popular. Many are realizing that what goes into our seemingly harmless supermarket and shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals.
Most people however view roadkill as ‘flat, furry, diseased and totally disgusting’.

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Eating roadkill has its own very special sociocultural taboos and hurdles to over-come. The first one is that animals falling into the above category are exactly that and not to be touched with someone else’s barge-pole, lol. Traffic casualties fit for human consumption are normally hit once and killed instantly, completely intact with minimum damage.

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Wild food foraging isn’t about being poor or desperate; it’s about being in tune with nature and our bodies. Some of its benefits are that it uses less packaging, less chemicals, less food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancer and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are boosted naturally.”

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My workshops are either individually tailored or totally spontaneous.  They often include discussions about the many symbolic, cultural, moral and ethical meanings and values of “recycling ”.  In particular awareness is raised with regard to the human consumption of Wild and “Accidental Meat” as opposed to the “factory farmed” varieties found in supermarkets and butcher’s shops.

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These sessions always include a practical workshop imparting some of the knowledge required for the preparation of dead animals for food, art and taxidermy.  With regard to eating ‘roadkill’ full instruction on how to identify and prepare road traffic accidents fit for human consumption is gone through step by step using

THE “Easy to Remember” ROAD-SIDE ROAD-KILL CULINARY CHECKLIST

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“I deal with all animals and participants in a sensitive, respectful, responsible and ‘matter of fact’ manner.  I feel that if one intends to be a carnivore , then one would benefit from knowing what the process involves – from beginning to end and in-between.”

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As with much of my work, I aspire to gently push the ‘experiencer’, including myself, to question preconceptions and socio-cultural taboos by creating something delicious, beautiful and compelling, often from something dead and/or socially repulsive.

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Is it still fresh?

Is it still fresh?

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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“When I see a tray of pre-packaged meat, I often wonder how the animal had been fed, what it ate, how it was looked after, respected, transported and finally slaughtered.  Did the animal suffer?  What has been pumped into it?  Is it full of antibiotics and growth hormones?  What is its carbon footprint?  Do I even want to put this meat in my body or offer it to my family?”

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Essential questions, especially if we are to try to live a ‘green’ and sustainable life now and in the future.

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Come and learn a Survival/Life Skill, and maybe even challenge your own perceptions and concepts of “weird”, “disgust”, and fears of death, the unknown and unusual.  You can participate on whatever level you choose be that culinary, survival, spiritual, political or environmental.

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fell edge workshop.

Engage and ask questions, or be a spectator – everyone is welcome – carnivore, vegetarian, vegan and freegan alike.

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Prepare to feel closer to Nature and more in tune with what you eat.

These are not your average workshops!

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Please contact me to discuss your thoughts and requirements.

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Ali cooking
Cooking road kill on Come Dine With Me.
(a 2 minute clip)

 

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