Tag Archive: alison brierly


“FOOT & FADGE” – Roadkill Terrine

Roadkill Rabbit and Pheasant Terrine with Pig’s Uterus, Trotters, Bacon and Goji Berries.

My 'Foot and Fadge' Terrine - Organic pigs trotter and uterus with goji berries.

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TERRINE is one of my favourate dishes!!  It has humble beginnings as a hearty meal for French labourers, but is now served in upscale restaurants as a starter.  You can experiment with terrine ingredients as much as you wish, nothing is carved in stone when it comes to these kinds of recipes!  It depends on what nature offers you at the time and your personal tastes!

This terrine came about from acquiring a recent roadkill rabbit and pheasant, a bag of organic pigs trotters from a local farm and a pigs uterus from the Chinese Supermarket!

Since the meat mixture is best marinated and left in the fridge for a day, cooked and cooled the next day and then left up to two days for proper pressing to occur, terrine can be a time-consuming dish. But it doesn’t have to be!

 

Wild Ingredients 

  • 1 roadkill pheasant
  • 1 roadkill rabbit

(Or whatever nature provides when using road-kill.  Use the breasts of pheasant, pigeon (or other bird) and saddles of rabbit, fox, deer, hare, etc, for the terrine; throw the rest of the game meat and bones into the stock pan, cook, cool and pick clean the bones, you can freeze the meat bits for later to use in another recipe). 

 

For the forcemeat  – This is a cold pressed terrine!

  • Chosen cuts of cooked meat, or/ and cold meat picked off the carcasses of pre-boiled game
  • livers from all the game (optional) fry off/ cook first
  • 1 handful fresh breadcrumbs (optional if Gluten Free)
  • 1 tbsp (lemon) thyme, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • trotter jelly
  • 1 tbsp dried and powdered nettle leaves  (these I forage every spring in bulk and dry out for the whole year.  Mostly dried for tea, I also powder and chuck into soups, stews, mash, gravy…all sorts!)

 

“I don’t always use bacon to line the tin, often I use a jelly, say, from a pigs head, ham hock or trotters.  I  like to decorate the top (first layer in the tin) with a few foraged edible leaves and/or fruits“.

 

Other Ingredients 

  • 6 rashers of smoked bacon
  • pre-soaked Goji berries (in Brandy tastes really good!)

 

 

Method 

Day One…

  1. Marinate the choice cuts of the game (saddles, breasts and thighs) in a generous splash of red wine (you could also throw in a few teaspoons of soft brown sugar if you want).
  2. Make a pork ‘binding’ jelly.  This can be made a day in advance by boiling the trotter or hock in a sauce pan, then simmering on a low heat for 3 hours, until the skin dissolves and the knuckles separate.

The gelatin removed from the meat is used as a preserving & jellying agent (as in the making of pork pies).  Nowadays artificial gelatin is often added, but I prefer the traditional method.

 

Day Two…

  1. Mix (in a blender) the cooked meat, cooked livers, breadcrumbs, season with the salt and pepper and mix together thoroughly with 4 or 5 tbsp of melted trotter jelly.  This is the forcemeat.
  2. Cut the marinated game meat into long strips about 2 fingers thick.
  3. Fry the game in oil/ butter until nicely browned, do not overcook the meat.
  4. Grease a 1lb loaf tin or glazed earthenware terrine dish with the butter.
  5. First cooked bacon rashers into the buttered base.  You can first add some pretty herb leaves for decoration if you fancy.  Be creative!!  Pour on a little of the warm, liquid jelly to bind the first layer, then a layer of forcemeat!  Allow to cool and set.
  6. When set, add another layer of forcemeat followed by a layer of game meat, and repeat this action until the game is gone.  Be mindful, think about the finished pattern when it is cut into slices.  Add the Goji berry layer somewhere in the middle.  Finish with a layer of the forcemeat.
  7. Terrines must be pressed as they cool to release trapped air.  This makes for a smooth texture and they’re easier to slice.  Find a piece of wood or plastic that fits snugly inside the terrine dish and weigh it down with a house brick (wrap in cling-film or foil in case it is a bit dirty).  If you have a spare loaf tin the same size, use that with a brick inside it.  Put the terrine in the fridge for 24 hours.

 

Day Three…

  1. To serve, remove from the tin, guide the knife around the edges and tap upside down on a chopping board to release.  If it doesn’t come out, pour some boiling water into a baking tin and warm the terrine for 10 seconds at a time, so the jelly begins to melt inside, but not so much that it melts the bulk of the terrine. When released, chill again and slice thickly while cold with a very sharp knife, clean the blade between slices.  Arrange on a plate with some chutney, jelly and warm brioche.

 

Also think about including… 

  • Foraged herbs and fruits of your choice – autumnal fruits such as plums, blackberries,cherries, apple or apricots work really well!  Be creative!!  Why not make your own chutney too?

 

 Making Roadkill Pies for Come Dine With Me“…so whats the difference?”

Wild Game Terrine was one of the dishes I served up on Come Dine With Me many years ago, alongside Curried Pheasant & Quinoa Roadkill Pies.  I served two dishes as I wanted to spark a debate if my guests wouldn’t eat the roadkill, but would eat the butcher bought meat.  My question was – “so whats the difference?”  It was the same wild animal, the difference being one had been deliberately shot with a gun, the other had been accidentally hit by a car!  If it was a question of ethics, which one was the most humane?  If it was a question of freshness, one had been hit by a car within a few hours, the other had been hung for over a week in the butchers shop…. which one would you eat?

As it happened they devoured them, and loved it all!    Phewwww!!

Click here for the 2 min trailer…

I hope you enjoy my other ROADKILL & “FERAL FUSION” recipes!

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………………….oOo………………..

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Pigs ears and trotters with goji berries - silk purse

“THE SILK PURSE” -aka- “PEPPER PIG”

Pigs Head Terrine

Made with the whole head, in particular the Ears!

 

“This terrine was made out of a pigs ear and a trotter!  It was a beautiful thing to look at, and tasted damn good too, dipped in an Asian style sauce made from soy sauce, mirin and sake, with ginger, garlic and spring onions…. mmmmmm!  

 

Will finish that blog and publish soon…

Enjoy!!

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siren song pic for FB WP
“Something is calling you.  
Something is calling from the quiet space inside and from the vast universe all around.

Something is calling forth the stream inside you and awakening you to your connection with the source!.

~~P Williams

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I recently experienced a “SIRENS SONG” – at least, at the time it was what I perceived it to be.  It was while I was participating in an all female group exercise at the Raising The Skirts event 2015.
The exercise involved forming two circles of around 16 women, one facing into the center of the circle, one facing out.  Placing our left hands on the heart of the woman on our left side, and the right hand on the heart of the woman on our right side.  We opened our hearts and eyes to the goddess in front of us and began to sing in tones, Oms, sounds, whatever came up at varying frequencies until they felt right, ‘fit’, harmonizing at a yoni and heart chakra level that suited ourselves and those we were touching.  For a while the sound was purely experimental, but after a time ‘weird’ became Wyrd!  It transformed into something eerily beautiful, sad and sweet, melancholy; a sound that ebbed and flowed like the sea and wind all around us as we happened to be on a secluded beach, standing on a huge flat rock over-looking the ocean.
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It was towards the end of the exercise I realized that what I was hearing was a ‘Sirens Song’!  The type of song sang by mythical female sea deities.  The song that irresistibly lured sailors to their exquisite death.  Until now I thought it was a simply an ancient Greek story, that these woeful, heart rendering and compelling voices only applied to men.  I was wrong.
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This circle of sisters, Goddesses all, each on a path to discover and deepen ourselves produced a haunting and hypnotic melody.  It connected us all, this nourishing yet sad song.  Soon it would be over, this experience, this moment in time.  This beautiful spot on the beach in a few hours time would be overtaken as the tide came in, submerged by the waves.  It left me feeling happy and sad at the same time.
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It was a few months later that I realized that THIS song I had heard was a HEART song – a SOUL song, and I had heard it because it was meant for my ‘death’.
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Carl G. Jung (1875-1961) believed that symbols materialize on their own account in our dreams, the expression of which is beyond the dimensions of time and space and in the sphere of unspecified and unlimited. These symbols therefore possess a numinous character and impress themselves on the general consciousness, disturbing for those minds used to operation within the limits of logic and rationality. Nevertheless, we can suppose that primordial images, sounds, sediments of accumulated memory, collective input, have a life of their own, independent of single individuals.
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“As children we dreamed of monsters; what matters is that they approach, threaten and we are astonished, terrified, bewitched, petrified; and we either flee or overcome them. Often the dream repeats again and again seeking integration and resolution”
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Sirens were said to know both the past and the future.  They were the Muses of the ‘Lower World’.  My ego was ready to die a little more, and ‘I’ was ready to enter…
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 “DYING TO SELF”

“The song of the Sirens call men to abandon themselves, to hurl into the deep, to sprout wings, to transform, to die to self and emerge into a new form with new knowledge and understanding. It is significant that Sirens are creatures of water for water has powerful symbolic value. Water is also a duality, it can sustain life, give comfort and it is a source of life and abundance. Water is the symbol we use for baptism and spiritual rebirth and renewal. It is the primordial soup, it represents purification and regeneration and it is the source from which each of us was born. Water however can also be destructive, causing inundation, drowning, annihilation and death. Sirens and mermaids embody all of these qualities and meanings and are thus symbols of both death and immortality. They call men to the unknown, to change and transformation the essential passage from one space to another, form one condition to another. They serve as escorts during times of transit, danger, transformation, uncertainty, sea voyages and missions of war. Sirens call man, urging him to abandon what he is, to become something new. Fear of Sirens is the fear of upsetting the established equilibrium, fear of the unknown, fear of transformation, fear of learning, fear of losing oneself, fear of being out of control and fear of descending into the deep (the unconscious)”

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photogram blue stained mermaid

 

“DEEP DIVING”

Mermaid – Photogram stained blue (1999)

with paper, hair and sloughed skin from my old python Monty.

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An excellent blog on the history of Sirens and Mermaids being symbols of transformation can be found here

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’! – Part 4

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

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Appreciation...

Appreciation…

Making the most of skin and feathers.

I always think it is a great shame not to use all of an animal that I find whilst foraging.  I have in the past and still to this day create some stunningly beautiful and compelling art work from dead things.  But where do you start?  How do you preserve a bird (or animal) skin for future use?  This short 7 minute film in the “Roadkill” series shows you how….

“Taxidermy in the Woodlands”

In this film I show you how to skin and preserve in a very basic way (using just salt) a bird in the feather.  This film features three birds; a blackbird, a magpie and a pheasant.

To see a close up image and blog about the Shamanic Roadkill Pheasant Cape click here!

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Last year I made these “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015.

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The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

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To see the other episodes in this series follow the links below…

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Capture plucking the pigeon woodland tv part b2

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Part 1: Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands

Part 2: Preparing Roadkill Pigeon for by the Woodlands

Part 3: Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands

Part 4: Taxidermy in the Woodlands

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media. Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors. These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

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REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

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close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it? If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try. If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards! Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today. Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

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Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

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oh deer

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DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

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To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’! – Part 3

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

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“Wild Wood-Pigeon Breast with Wild Blackberry Sauce and Wild Boletus infused Moroccan Cous-Cous”

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.

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015.

This week the latest 5 minute follow-up film emerged  – PART 3

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Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands”

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The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

.

To see PART 2

“Preparing Roadkill Pigeon to eat in the Woodlands”

Click here!

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Capture plucking the pigeon woodland tv part b2

*******************

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media. Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors. These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

.

*******************

REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it? If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try. If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards! Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today. Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

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DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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“The Silent Dancer in the Flames”

 

Jpeg

“The Silent Dancer in the Flames”

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Oil Pastel (2015) by Alison Brierley

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THE SILENT DANCER

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Spectators All
Cheer On the Reluctant Fire Dancers
Executing their Final Performance 
Slaves to the Purple Post
Writhing in the Flames
Just one Leap away from Redemption
And then Another

I am the Silent Dancer
I did not have to Dance the Exquisite Dance
I did not have to Suffer the Burn

but Embraced its Searing Release
I am already Dead you See
I did not Survive the Torture
The Asphyxiation
The Crush of Rock on Rib and Lung

But they Tied me to the Mast 
Just to Be Sure
And Burnt me Anyway
Along with my Sisters

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By Alison Brierley

(8th June 2015)

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One in a series of works brought about by my exploration into the “TRUTH TELLING YEARS” aka MENOPAUSE.

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Look out for blogs on my other ART projects – SHAMANIC ROADKILL CAPE, PLACENTA  ART &COOKERY, PLACENTA BOOTIES,  PLACENTA DISCO-BOOTIES, SHAMANIC SHAKTI BEAVER MERKINANTI  BADGER-CULL TRIP-TIC, ROADKILL SQUIRREL TESTICLE EARRINGS  , BURNING-MAN ASARO MUD-FAMILY PERFORMANCE ART , JAPANESE WISHING TREE and many many more!!

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As with a lot of my work, I aspire to gently push the viewer, including myself, to question preconceptions and socio-cultural taboos by creating something beautiful and compelling from something dead and/or socially repulsive.

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Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

“Tribal Ali, an English ‘Zorro with a Scalpel’ doing for wild cookery what Charlie Dimmock did for gardening”

.

Capture roadkill for woodlands tv part 1.JPG2 .

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands” aired on the 15th April 2015 and today the latest short follow-up film emerged entitled: Part 2 –

“Preparing Roadkill Pigeon to eat in the Woodlands”

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Click here to see the 4.30 minute film

Preparing:

“Wild Wood-Pigeon Breast with Wild Blackberry Sauce and Wild Mushroom Cous-Cous”

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The actual cooking of the dish is covered in the next short film aired on the 15th June 2015.

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“Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands”

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The most common question I get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and often ‘Vegetarian’ friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an

‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

.

*******************

.

Making Movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Originally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media.

Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors.

These movies are for Woodlands.TV .woodlands_TV

.

*******************

REMEMBER!!

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

.

.

close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat heavily laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

.

Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

.

oh deer

.

DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

.

To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

.

THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

.

.

Making movies for ‘Woodlands TV’!

Last year I made some “Wild Food Foraging in the Woodlands” films with Film Maker Claudia Nye.

The pilot film in the “Roadkill” series “Identification” aired on the 15th April 2015 and short follow-up films about woodland cookery, skinning, preparation and preservation emerged on the 15th of each month till August/ September 2015.

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Click here to see the 7 minute film or on the image below!

woodlands tv title shot.

The most common question Wild Meat Foragers get is “How do you know it is safe to eat?”

“Wild food foraging in all its forms isn’t about being poor or desperate, its about being opportunistic, creative, in tune with ourselves, nature and our bodies.  Wild meat foraging in particular uses no packaging, has less chemicals, fewer food miles and contains less pollution; it is cruelty free and ‘often’ Vegetarian friendly; it fosters biodiversity; our bodies ‘understand’ these natural foods, therefore cancers and other physical ailments are minimized because our immune systems are minds are boosted naturally.

.

Part 1: Identifying Edible Roadkill by the Woodlands

Part 2: Preparing Roadkill Pigeon for by the Woodlands

Part 3: Cooking Roadkill Pigeon in the Woodlands

Part 4: Taxidermy in the Woodlands

Part 5: Cooking Accidental Meat in the Woodlands

Part 6: Tribal Arts and Crafts in the Woodlands

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So WHY waste so many creative opportunities and a good, clean source of protein?

Many are realising that numerous shop bought food items are more suspicious than nutritious. Wild plants are very different now from chemically cultivated foods and farm animals taste nothing like game animals”.

If the first step beyond Taboo is stopping you have a look at the list of “Do’s and Don’ts” below.

I have in the past written plenty of long-winded explanations but I felt it was time to create an ‘Easier to Remember’ ROAD-SIDE CHECKLIST! 

.

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

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Thanks to Claudia Nye we now have the VISUAL version!

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claudia nye mugshotOriginally from Argentina, Claudia is a Scarborough based, award winning BAFTA nominated documentary film maker with 21 years experience in the field of media.

Her work ranges from broadcast (BBC/Channel Four) to private and public Commissions (Film Council/European Fund), through facilitating community based projects with the youth, and teaching in FE and HE sectors.

These movies are for woodlands_TV

Will post the links ‘as and when’. X

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The Original BLOG….

“Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

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Is it still fresh?

What most people visualise when they think of roadkill.

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“Health and Culinary you say? In the same sentence as Roadkill???   Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!”…. but seriously, you will be surprised at how healthy roadkill can be.

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Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

Fresh Wild Rabbit Dumplings with Nettle and Sorrel Stuffing!

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I asked some “wordsmithy” friends if they wanted to help me to create a  humourous mnemonic.  Mnemonics are memory devices that help learners recall larger pieces of information, especially in the form of lists like characteristics, steps, stages, parts, phases, etc.  For the list I had in mind this was the perfect tool.

My dear old friend Mark “BUZZ” Busby did me, and all you fellow “Splatter Spotters”, very proud indeed with this…

Don’t Eat Flat Furry Roadside Snacks Before Last Diagnostic Smell Check”

Thank You Buzz!  You’re a genius! 

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Soooo!  That is the quick and easy way to remember the essential pointers:

‘Damage’, ‘Eyes’, ‘Fleas & Flies’, ‘Rigor Mortis’, ‘Skin’, ‘Blood’, ‘Law’, ‘Diseases’, Smell’ and last but not least ‘Climate & Cooking’.

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Damage

roadkill20n-1-webAvoid animals that have been badly damaged or ruptured internally.  Check the animal carefully before stuffing it in the boot of the car (gloves are recommended and a plastic bag or tarp).  If you saw the accident happen then you know it is definitely fresh.  If you didn’t, only pick up those that have ‘bounced’ from being hit cleanly once, preferably to the side of the road, and with someone else’s car, lol.  Obviously, don’t pick up something that’s been run over a couple or ten times, looks sick or abnormal!!

Eyes

black rabbit eyeWhat do the eyes look like?  Are there any eyes at all?

Carrion birds arrive at the scene of a road traffic accident quickly and especially first thing in the morning.  Eyes are soft, succulent and easy to pluck!  If there is still an eye left on the underside check  it to see if it is still clear.  Cloudy eyes can indicate that it isn’t fresh anymore.

 

Fleas & Flies

flies on foxThis is easy to remember – “FLEAS GOOD!  FLIES BAD!”.  Living & active fleas are a good sign of freshness – fleas will soon evacuate a cold dead body.  If you feel squeamish about fleas a 24 hour spell in the deep freeze will finish them off.

Flies will find a carcass quickly, especially in warm weather.  You may find tiny clusters of fresh long, white, oblong shaped eggs around the eyes, mouth, or other orifices.  This is not so bad if you don’t intend to eat these bits and the eggs have only just been laid.  If you are not sure about this or anything else mentioned so far, leave it be.

Do do not pick anything up that is old enough to be crawling with beetles, maggots or other larvae.  be wary of ticks that may carry Lymes Disease.  Contain ticks on a deer carcass whilst in the car using a sheet or plastic tarp.

 

Rigor Mortis

rigor mortisA stiff animal could just be in Rigor which means it’s still fresh, but keep in mind the previous tips when judging time of death.

The rate at which Rigor Mortis sets in will depend on several factors such as the animals physique, cause of death and the climate.  Different sources give different figures, but very broadly and in ‘average’ circumstances with roadkill it begins from 1/2 hr (bird) – 24 hrs (deer).   It becomes complete in about 12 hours or more.

Then the body relaxes again, this time as a result of decomposition. This is known as resolution of rigor.  The stiffness in the muscle tissues begins to decrease owing to the enzymatic breakdown of collagen that hold muscle fibers together. This phenomenon is also referred to as “Aging of Meat”.  This aging effect produces meats that are more tender and palatable, hence the ‘hanging of game’!

 

Skin

Rabbit-FurDoes the skin have fur or feathers attached to it?  Give fur a gentle tug to see if it is still firmly rooted in the skin.  You don’t want chunks of hair falling out easily.   Alopecia could be a sure sign that the carcass is too old or that the animal was suffering from a disease.

The skin will move freely across the muscles if the carcass is fresh.  Black or purple marks can indicate where the animal has been hit, these are okay, but you may want to cut the severely bruised bits of meat away before cooking.

 

Blood

roadkill badgerThere shouldn’t be that much blood on a carcass suitable for eating.  A bloody mouth or nose is fairly normal.

Ideally any blood needs to be fresh, wet and bright red.  Blood or no, you should use gloves to handle dead animals, you still have to get back in the car and touch the steering wheel, your passengers, packed lunch, etc.  Always keep a stash of wet wipes handy!

 

Law

The-LawGenerally, the UK is pretty good at allowing folk to dine from the road.  Farmed animals like sheep and pigs belong to someone so they should be reported.  Wild animals aren’t classified as ‘owned’ unless they’re specifically being farmed, in which case they need to be on land secured by fencing, so you’d not be likely to hit them.  If found on the road they are “Fair Game”.  Domestic animals like cats and dogs should also be reported.

I am no expert on the laws of other countries, so check yourself if you really need to know specifics.

 

Diseases

Tuberculosis-virusDo Your “Zoonotic” Disease Homework!  It is essential to research the kinds of diseases certain wild animals can catch or carry and what signs to look for.  Very rarely do they transfer to humans if proper procedures are followed.  Avoid giving anything you are NOT unquestionably sure about to YOUNG CHILDREN, the ENFEEBLED or PREGNANT WOMEN, just to be on the safe side.

Cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically all nasties!  That includes ToxoplasmosisBovine TB, Myxomatosis and even Rabies!!

I would be wary of eating badger from the road at the moment…. farmers who view badgers as health threats are putting their poisoned animals by the roadside to make them ‘look’ like roadkill… so be warned.  I am not touching badgers for a while.

 

Smell

sniffing the deadListen to your nose… if it smells rotten, don’t take it!

You can tell a lot by smell before you start to butcher.  Smell and flavour in all meat is a combination of age, exercise, species, breed and diet.  Wild animal meat can smell quite strong and ‘gamey’.

Fat is also the home of any weird or odd smell you might find in wild game; and because of its unsaturated nature also meas it goes rancid faster.   Don’t ditch good wild fat though, it is very high in important vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids.

The varied diet of a game animal means that any fat-soluble ester or terpene or other flavour molecule that critter has metabolized will end up on your dinner plate.

If it smells okay on the outside but when you open it up it smells much more than just gamey don’t eat it.  Intestines have their own unique scent which you get used to and can judge accordingly.  Mild gas, urine and a bit of poop may be normal too, so use your instincts on all this until experience tells you otherwise.

Male animals in rutting season can be very ‘musky’ and not palatable.  No surprise there!  lol.

 

Climate & Cooking

snow roadkill deer warningCold and dry climates are better for freshness; nature makes a great fridge and freezer sometimes.  Be careful in warm and hot weather – bugs find the dead quickly and meat spoils easily.

Consider how long the animal will be stored in a warm vehicle after you have claimed it.  Use the cooler parts of the car, for example NOT in the passenger foot-well with the floor heater on full.  I have put a small animal in a plastic bag before now and secured it tightly on the outside of a wound-up window!  Looked weird but it worked wonderfully!

When you get to your final destination prepare or preserve your carcass ASAP.

As mentioned earlier, cooking the animal thoroughly above 70 degrees centigrade is highly recommended and boiling point will kill practically everything!

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As you can see, you need to know what you’re doing, but it’s not rocket science!! 

If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!

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close up curious pigeonsSooooo!  Should you try it?

If you can stomach the thought of eating roadkill, and are confident you can pick out the animals safe for consumption, then I’d urge you to give it a try.

If you’ve ever eaten pheasant, hare or rabbit in a restaurant, paid a small fortune for the privilege and almost broken your teeth on the buckshot, you’d probably relish the chance to eat your gamey goodness without the fear of fillings afterwards!

Eating properly examined and prepared roadkill is definitely healthier than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones, and growth stimulants, as most supermarket meat is today.

Road traffic casualties never knew what hit ‘em – if you pardon the pun!  They did not experience what it was like to be factory farmed, castrated, de-horned, or de-beaked without anaesthetics, they did not suffer the traumatic and miserable experience of being transported long distances in a crowded truck, and did not hear the screams and smell the fear of the animals ahead of them on the slaughter line.

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Ethically, I know what I would rather eat!

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oh deer

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DISCLAIMER… I have to say that I hold NO responsibility for anyone getting sick from eating Roadkill.  I offer my experiences and knowledge here freely, I do not make myself accountable for anyone else.  YOU make a choice, YOU take responsibility.  If in doubt, ask someone else’s advice who knows what they are doing, or just leave it well alone!  With that said….

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To see other of my blogs relating to this subject follow the links…

 

“WILD MEAT” – Wild Food & Roadkill Preparation & Preservation Workshops

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – Roadkill Recycling, Eating and Artwork…

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THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR- Making a film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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Intrepid Culinarian and Global Connoisseur

The ‘MUNCHIES’ Food Channel Presents:

 THE ROADKILL CONNOISSEUR

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Capture - Roadkill Connoisseur - Flesh is flesh

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Cooking, and especially EATING has been a life long passion.  I have travelled the world in search of the weird and wonderful.

It’s ironic that I then become famous for a strange little quirk that I discovered whilst learning the art of Taxidermy….

This 5 minute film is a nice little introduction to said ‘quirk‘!  lol.

So, this is me cooking…

Southern Fried Squirrel”

& “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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Click here to watch the film on YouTube, or the image above for the official MUNCHIES 5 min film (can be glitchy!)

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IMG_1042A ‘How to’ film for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

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I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show is pretty funny, lol.

 

Click on the recipe titles for ingredients and methods.

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Southern Fried Squirrel”

&

“Squirrel Pot-Sticker Dumplings”.

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freemantlemedia uk

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Orientation Travel Productions and Dutch host Thomas Acda go on a “Roadkill Road Trip” around North Yorkshire with yours truly!

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orientationSpent a wonderfully full day on a warm and sunny Summer Solstice filming a pilot episode with the Orientation Production team of five wonderfully funny folk from the Netherlands.

The host, Thomas Acda, is a well known rock star, song writer, actor and comedian.  He is making a series very similar to that of Anthony Bourdain; traveling the world, meeting new and interesting people and having epiphanies through culinary experiences.

The day was spent foraging, exploring the beautiful countryside, looking for roadkill, cooking it, chatting and having a fun time.  We ended around a camp fire with some fantastic friends/ local musicians.  We certainly showed them some good old Yorkshire hospitality.

Sorry, not allowed to post anything else until the program is aired on mainstream Dutch TV this year.  Will post links ASAP.

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Making a “How To…” film for the ‘MUNCHIES’ food Channel!

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IMG_1042“How To Cook Roadkill” for the MUNCHIES food Channel.

I spent a very pleasurable half day with two guys from VICE / Freemantle Media UK making a show for their “How to…” series.

MUNCHIES chronicles the wide spectrum of the global culinary experience. They liked how I combine roadkill with various forms of cookery styles and ingredients and asked if I would cook for the show. I enjoyed links to the other episodes so said yes!

I made two of my “Feral Fusion” recipes using squirrel – “Southern Fried Squirrel” & “Squirrel Pot-Stickers Dumplings”.  They were very tasty and the show promises to be pretty funny, lol.

It should be ready to view online in a few months with a working title of “From Tarmac to Table!”.

freemantlemedia ukCan’t disclose anything else because it hasn’t aired yet but will post the link ASAP. X

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