Tag Archive: wild game terrine


“THE SILK PURSE” -aka- “PEPPER PIG”

Pigs Head Terrine

Made with the whole head, in particular the Ears!

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“This dish was totally awesome, the flavours and textures rivaled any I’ve had in my favourate restaurants!  This terrine was made out of a pigs ear and a trotter!  It was a beautiful thing to look at, and tasted damn good too, dipped in an Asian style sauce made from soy sauce, mirin and sake, with ginger, garlic and spring onions…. mmmmmm!”  

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TERRINE is one of my favourate dishes!!  It has humble beginnings as a hearty meal for French labourers, but is now served in upscale restaurants as a starter.  You can experiment with terrine ingredients as much as you wish, nothing is carved in stone when it comes to these kinds of recipes!  It depends on what nature offers you at the time and your personal tastes!

Since the meat mixture is best marinated and left in the fridge for a day, cooked and cooled the next day and then left up to two days for proper pressing to occur, terrine can be a time-consuming dish. But it doesn’t have to be!

pig headThis terrine came about whilst visiting a friend in Scotland.  My friend and I often swap oddities, techniques, recipes and make things from dead bits, this occasion was no different.  This trip consisted of much outdoor cookery, taxidermy practice and a pigs head!

Ingredients 

  • 1 pig head
  • 2 tblsp pink peppercorn
  • 1 tblsp black peppercorns
  • dash salt and pepper

“I don’t always use bacon to line the tin, often I use a jelly, say, from a pigs head, ham hock or trotters.  I  like to decorate the top (first layer in the tin) with a few foraged edible leaves and/or fruits“.

Other Ingredients 

Asian dipping sauce! 

  • Soy sause
  • Sake
  • Mirin
  • ginger
  • garlic
  • Spring onions

pig head brawnMethod 

“The gelatin removed from the meat is used as a preserving & jellying agent (as in the making of pork pies).  Nowadays artificial gelatin is often added, but I prefer the traditional method”.

  1. Boil the pig head in a large pan covered with water until the meat starts to fall off.  Then pull as much meat off as you can.
  2. Make a pork ‘binding’ jelly.  This can be made a day in advance by boiling the trotter or hock in a sauce pan, then simmering on a low heat for 3 hours, until the skin dissolves and the knuckles separate.
  3. Season the jelly with salt and pepper
  4. Line the tin in layers, starting with the pink peppercorns.  Add layer by layer of meat pausing to pour some of the melted jelly binder.
  5. When finished put in fridge till set.
  6. Turn out and serve with the delicious Asian dipping sauce.

 

 

Also think about including… 

  • Foraged herbs and fruits of your choice – autumnal fruits such as plums, blackberries,cherries, apple or apricots work really well!  Be creative!!  Why not make your own chutney too?
  • Wild foraged meat – ROADKILL!

I often make my terrines from Accidental Meats/ Roadkill.  It sparks conversation and debate….

 

 Making Roadkill Pies for Come Dine With Me“…so whats the difference?”

Wild Game Terrine was one of the dishes I served up on Come Dine With Me many years ago, alongside Curried Pheasant & Quinoa Roadkill Pies.  I served two dishes as I wanted to spark a debate if my guests wouldn’t eat the roadkill, but would eat the butcher bought meat.  My question was – “so whats the difference?”  It was the same wild animal, the difference being one had been deliberately shot with a gun, the other had been accidentally hit by a car!  If it was a question of ethics, which one was the most humane?  If it was a question of freshness, one had been hit by a car within a few hours, the other had been hung for over a week in the butchers shop…. which one would you eat?

As it happened they devoured them, and loved it all!    Phewwww!!

Click here for the 2 min trailer…

I hope you enjoy my other ROADKILL & “FERAL FUSION” recipes!

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“FOOT & FADGE” – Roadkill Terrine – “FERAL FUSION” – Wild Food Recipes with Trotters, Uterus and Goji Berries

 

Roadkill Rabbit and Pheasant Terrine with Pig’s Uterus, Trotters, Bacon and Goji Berries.

Enjoy!!

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“FOOT & FADGE” – Roadkill Terrine

Roadkill Rabbit and Pheasant Terrine with Pig’s Uterus, Trotters, Bacon and Goji Berries.

My 'Foot and Fadge' Terrine - Organic pigs trotter and uterus with goji berries.

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TERRINE is one of my favourate dishes!!  It has humble beginnings as a hearty meal for French labourers, but is now served in upscale restaurants as a starter.  You can experiment with terrine ingredients as much as you wish, nothing is carved in stone when it comes to these kinds of recipes!  It depends on what nature offers you at the time and your personal tastes!

This terrine came about from acquiring a recent roadkill rabbit and pheasant, a bag of organic pigs trotters from a local farm and a pigs uterus from the Chinese Supermarket!

Since the meat mixture is best marinated and left in the fridge for a day, cooked and cooled the next day and then left up to two days for proper pressing to occur, terrine can be a time-consuming dish. But it doesn’t have to be!

 

Wild Ingredients 

  • 1 roadkill pheasant
  • 1 roadkill rabbit

(Or whatever nature provides when using road-kill.  Use the breasts of pheasant, pigeon (or other bird) and saddles of rabbit, fox, deer, hare, etc, for the terrine; throw the rest of the game meat and bones into the stock pan, cook, cool and pick clean the bones, you can freeze the meat bits for later to use in another recipe). 

 

For the forcemeat  – This is a cold pressed terrine!

  • Chosen cuts of cooked meat, or/ and cold meat picked off the carcasses of pre-boiled game
  • livers from all the game (optional) fry off/ cook first
  • 1 handful fresh breadcrumbs (optional if Gluten Free)
  • 1 tbsp (lemon) thyme, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • trotter jelly
  • 1 tbsp dried and powdered nettle leaves  (these I forage every spring in bulk and dry out for the whole year.  Mostly dried for tea, I also powder and chuck into soups, stews, mash, gravy…all sorts!)

 

“I don’t always use bacon to line the tin, often I use a jelly, say, from a pigs head, ham hock or trotters.  I  like to decorate the top (first layer in the tin) with a few foraged edible leaves and/or fruits“.

 

Other Ingredients 

  • 6 rashers of smoked bacon
  • pre-soaked Goji berries (in Brandy tastes really good!)

 

 

Method 

Day One…

  1. Marinate the choice cuts of the game (saddles, breasts and thighs) in a generous splash of red wine (you could also throw in a few teaspoons of soft brown sugar if you want).
  2. Make a pork ‘binding’ jelly.  This can be made a day in advance by boiling the trotter or hock in a sauce pan, then simmering on a low heat for 3 hours, until the skin dissolves and the knuckles separate.

The gelatin removed from the meat is used as a preserving & jellying agent (as in the making of pork pies).  Nowadays artificial gelatin is often added, but I prefer the traditional method.

 

Day Two…

  1. Mix (in a blender) the cooked meat, cooked livers, breadcrumbs, season with the salt and pepper and mix together thoroughly with 4 or 5 tbsp of melted trotter jelly.  This is the forcemeat.
  2. Cut the marinated game meat into long strips about 2 fingers thick.
  3. Fry the game in oil/ butter until nicely browned, do not overcook the meat.
  4. Grease a 1lb loaf tin or glazed earthenware terrine dish with the butter.
  5. First cooked bacon rashers into the buttered base.  You can first add some pretty herb leaves for decoration if you fancy.  Be creative!!  Pour on a little of the warm, liquid jelly to bind the first layer, then a layer of forcemeat!  Allow to cool and set.
  6. When set, add another layer of forcemeat followed by a layer of game meat, and repeat this action until the game is gone.  Be mindful, think about the finished pattern when it is cut into slices.  Add the Goji berry layer somewhere in the middle.  Finish with a layer of the forcemeat.
  7. Terrines must be pressed as they cool to release trapped air.  This makes for a smooth texture and they’re easier to slice.  Find a piece of wood or plastic that fits snugly inside the terrine dish and weigh it down with a house brick (wrap in cling-film or foil in case it is a bit dirty).  If you have a spare loaf tin the same size, use that with a brick inside it.  Put the terrine in the fridge for 24 hours.

 

Day Three…

  1. To serve, remove from the tin, guide the knife around the edges and tap upside down on a chopping board to release.  If it doesn’t come out, pour some boiling water into a baking tin and warm the terrine for 10 seconds at a time, so the jelly begins to melt inside, but not so much that it melts the bulk of the terrine. When released, chill again and slice thickly while cold with a very sharp knife, clean the blade between slices.  Arrange on a plate with some chutney, jelly and warm brioche.

 

Also think about including… 

  • Foraged herbs and fruits of your choice – autumnal fruits such as plums, blackberries,cherries, apple or apricots work really well!  Be creative!!  Why not make your own chutney too?

 

 Making Roadkill Pies for Come Dine With Me“…so whats the difference?”

Wild Game Terrine was one of the dishes I served up on Come Dine With Me many years ago, alongside Curried Pheasant & Quinoa Roadkill Pies.  I served two dishes as I wanted to spark a debate if my guests wouldn’t eat the roadkill, but would eat the butcher bought meat.  My question was – “so whats the difference?”  It was the same wild animal, the difference being one had been deliberately shot with a gun, the other had been accidentally hit by a car!  If it was a question of ethics, which one was the most humane?  If it was a question of freshness, one had been hit by a car within a few hours, the other had been hung for over a week in the butchers shop…. which one would you eat?

As it happened they devoured them, and loved it all!    Phewwww!!

Click here for the 2 min trailer…

I hope you enjoy my other ROADKILL & “FERAL FUSION” recipes!

.

………………….oOo………………..

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Pigs ears and trotters with goji berries - silk purse

“THE SILK PURSE” -aka- “PEPPER PIG”

Pigs Head Terrine

Made with the whole head, in particular the Ears!

 

“This terrine was made out of a pigs ear and a trotter!  It was a beautiful thing to look at, and tasted damn good too, dipped in an Asian style sauce made from soy sauce, mirin and sake, with ginger, garlic and spring onions…. mmmmmm!  

 

Will finish that blog and publish soon…

Enjoy!!

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I have been asked to put up some of my ROADKILL recipes.   There are lots so I will start with one of my favourites… TERRINE!!

It has humble beginnings as a hearty meal for French labourers, but is now served in upscale restaurants as a starter.

Wild Game Terrine was one of the dishes I served up on Come Dine With Me earlier this year, alongside Curried Pheasant & Quinoa Roadkill Pies.  I served two dishes as I wanted to spark a debate if my guests wouldn’t eat the roadkill, but would eat the butcher bought meat.  My question was – so whats the difference?  It was the same wild animal, the difference being one had been delliberatly shot with a gun, the other had been accidentally hit by a car!  If it was a question of ethics, which one was the most humane?  If it was a question of freshness, one had been hit by a car within a few hours, the other had been hung for over a week in the butchers shop…. which one would you eat? 

As it happened they devoured them, and loved it all!    Phewwww!! 

I hope you enjoy the following recipes!

 

Wild Game Terrine with Foraged Fruit Chutney & Toasted Brioche

Since the meat mixture is best marinated and left in the fridge for a day, then cooked and cooled the next day and then left up to two days for proper pressing to occur, terrine is a time-consuming dish.

Roadkill/ Meat Ingredients 

  • 1 pheasant
  • 1 rabbit
  • 1 organic (if possible) pigs trotter 

 

(Or whatever nature provides when using road-kill – however, the trotters are hard to find on the road!! LOL.) Use the breasts of pheasant, pigeon (or other bird) and saddles of rabbit or hare for the terrine; throw the rest of the game meat and bones into the stock pan, cook, cool and pick clean the bones, you can freeze the meat bits for later to use in another recipe – or, include them in this dish). 

Also think about including… 

  • Herbs and fruits of your choice – for example; parsley, lovage, thyme and Autumnal fruits such as plums, apple or apricots!  Be creative!!

 

For the forcemeat  – This is a cold pressed terrine!

  • Chosen cuts of cooked meat, or/ and cold meat picked off the carcasses of pre-boiled game
  • livers from all the game (optional) fry off/ cook first 
  • 1 handful fresh breadcrumbs
  • 2 tbsp parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp (lemon) thyme, finely chopped
  • 1 tbs red wine or brandy
  • salt and pepper
  • trotter jelly
  • coriander leaves
  • 6 juniper berries

(My own special touch…If I don’t use bacon to line the tin, and use a jelly, say, from a pigs head, ham hock or trotters, I occasionally like to decorate the top (first layer in the tin) with a few foraged edible leaves, like lovage.  I love using offal, I once tried a terrine using a pig’s uterus and trotters, it was incredible!  I called it the ‘Foot & Fadge’ – opposite.)

 

Method 

Day One…

  1. Marinate the choice cuts of the game (saddles, breasts and thighs) in a generous splash of red wine (you could also throw in a few teaspoons of soft brown sugar if you want).
  2. Make a pork ‘binding’ jelly.  This can be made a day in advance by boiling the trotter or hock in a sauce pan, then simmering on a low heat for 3 hours, until the skin dissolves and the knuckles separate. 

The gelatine removed from the meat is used as a preserving & jellying agent (as in the making of pork pies).  Nowadays artificial gelatine is often added, but I prefer the traditional method.

Day Two…

  1. Mix (in a blender) the cooked meat, cooked livers, breadcrumbs, egg, parsley, thyme, juniper berries, wine/ brandy, season with the salt and pepper and mix together thoroughly with 4 or 5 tbsp of melted trotter jelly.  This is the forcemeat.
  2. Cut the marinated game meat into long strips about 2 fingers thick.
  3. Fry the game in oil/ butter until nicely browned, do not overcook the meat.
  4. Grease a 1lb loaf tin or glazed earthenware terrine dish with the butter. 
  5. Press some herb leaves to the buttered base for decoration.  Be creative!!  Pour on a little of the warm, liquid jelly to bind the first layer!  Allow to cool and set.
  6. When set, add a layer of forcemeat followed by a layer of game meat, and repeat this action until the game is gone.  Again, when layout of the meat strips, be mindful, think about the finished pattern when it is cut into slices.  Finish with a layer of the forcemeat.
  7. Terrines must be pressed as they cool to release trapped air.  This makes for a smooth texture and they’re easier to slice.  Find a piece of wood or plastic that fits snugly inside the terrine dish and weigh it down with a house brick (wrap in cling-film or foil in case it is a bit dirty).  If you have a spare loaf tin the same size, use that with a brick inside it.  Put the terrine in the fridge for 24 hours.

Day Three…

  1. To serve, remove from the tin, guide the knife around the edges and tap upside down on a chopping board to release.  If it doesn’t come out, pour some boiling water into a baking tin and warm the terrine for 10 seconds at a time, so the jelly begins to melt inside, but not so much that it melts the bulk of the terrine. When released, chill again and slice thickly while cold with a very sharp knife, clean the blade between slices.  Arrange on a plate with the chutney and warm brioche.

 

For the Foraged Fruit Chutney: 

Gathering the fruits, jars, and the time consuming job of peeling, stoning and chopping is often made easier and more fun by working as a team.  We all then get to share the end product. This was originally my amazing friend Tina’s recipe.  She doesn’t really use weights and measures, but to make it easy she gave a ‘guess-timation’. 

 

Ingredients 

  • 1 lb small yellow wild plums
  • 10 fl oz white wine vinegar
  • 1 onion – finely chopped
  • ½ tspn pepper
  • 3 whole dried chillies
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 10 black pepper corns
  • ½ tspn cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp celery seeds
  • Honey to taste

 Method 

  1. Wash, slice and de-stone your chosen foraged fruits.
  2. Put all the spices in a muslin bag.  You can make one by cutting a large circle of muslin, putting all the ingredients in the middle and tying securely with a piece of uncoloured/ clean/ unbleached cotton or string. 
  3. Gently soften the chopped onions in a little butter.
  4. Put the vinegar in the pan and add the plums and spice-bag.  Bring to the boil, and then simmer until soft – about 15 mins is okay.
  5. Add honey to taste.
  6. Pour into hot, sterilised jars if preserving.  Try not to use the dishwasher to sterilise your jars, it makes them smell.

…serve with lightly toasted slices of Brioche or toast

 

You can experiment with all of this in your own way of course…nothing is carved in stone when it comes to these kinds of recipes!  It depends on what nature offers you at the time and your personal tastes!   This terrine was made out of a pigs ear and a trotter!  It was a beautiful thing to look at, and tasted damn good too, dipped in a chinese style sauce made from soy with ginger, garlic and spring onions…. mmmmmm!  It was called “The Silk Purse Terrine”!

Enjoy!!

 

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Ali cooking
Ali cooking road kill on Come Dine With Me

I am a road kill recycler, cook and wild food forager. I love being creative and injecting humour into what I ‘rustle up’!  I enjoy the challenge of using the body parts other cooks don’t like to use!
This is one of many creations – the ‘Foot & Fadge’ terrine made from an organic pig’s trotter and uterus with goji berries!   I didn’t serve this pork terrine on Come Dine With Me though… maybe I should have!  lol.
I often hold impromptu workshops at camps and small festivals, teaching the joys of Road Kill Preparation.  It always amazes me how squeamish your average carnivore is!  I love what I do. I am a very happy scavenger and I dislike waste.

Soooo, take a look at my latest ROAD KILL cookery adventure …  COME DINE WITH ME – ROAD KILL THRILLS

Watch me make some road kill pies by following this link or clicking on the large pic above: Series 20 Episode 29 – HARROGATE »

To watch the full  hour long programme click here: Hairy harrogate & Road Kill Thrills – Come Dine With Me.

Come Dine With Me

Special Thanks

Harrogate – Series 20 Episode 29

 Special thanks go to the following people and companies who very generously donated ingredients & things in order to make my contribution a truly wonderful and authentic experience.    

                                     Thank you.                           

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 In order of appearance…     

 

The House

 A huge, positively massive “Thank you” to my dear friends Les & Marisca, for offering their home to me. 

Hope you enjoy the show!!  

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The Studio

Artists Ltd is a UK Company based in Yorkshire. The founders of the company all have a background in the arts either as practitioners or suppliers. They started the company to provide a comprehensive UK based Internet presence which would facilitate the development of an artistic community.

Thank you dear friends – Bernie, Fraser and Andy for the loan of your studio in Harrogate, it was great fun having the Channel 4 crew there for the primary interviews. 

By email: info@artists.ltd.uk

www.artists.ltd.uk

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The Motor Home

While we were waiting for our new home to appear (which it now has) we borrowed a motor home from a friend… it turned out to be a bit bigger than we anticipated.  It was a 30ft RS Motorhomes Race Cruiser!  It is used most of the year for race weekends with Track Torque Racing and the odd weekend getaway for the family. 
Track Torque is a racing company who own and rent out race cars to race drivers.  They also look after race cars for their owners.  Most weekends in summer are spent at a race track somewhere in the UK or Europe.
Thank you Clive, Les and Mariska for sorting that out.

Track Torque Racing Ltd, Units 8+9, Rudgate Business Park, Rudgate, Tockwith, North Yorkshire YO26 7RD

Map Direction Here >

Tel  – 01423 359768
Clive –  07971 978775
Simon –  07971 154703

http://www.tracktorque.co.uk/

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Frangelico & Vodka cocktail shot served with Caramelised Lime wedges

 This cocktail shot was inspired by one I believe was called a Funky Monkey, tried whilst staying in La Paz, Bolivia last year.  It was my first night out after recovering from a bad case of Salmonella acquired from eating a dirty old pigs trotter at a Cholita wrestling match!  I have searched for it on the web since returning to the UK and have come up with at least four completely different cocktails.  I made it up the best I remember…

Thank you nameless Bolivian Bar for the inspiration and thank you Mum for buying the booze!

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       The Wine

All the wine was hand-picked to match each dish within my menu by my good friends and Wine merchants at Harrogate Fine Wines – Andrew & Julia Langshaw.  They have a great reputation for hand-picked wines and excellent bespoke customer service. They taste all the wines they stock for quality assurance – what a great job!!  Lol.  They hold regular customer tastings in the shop and hold a few wine dinners throughout the year generally with a winemaker on hand to talk you through the wines. They are proudly independent which means they can stock rare and small selections.  They have over 100 South African wines and visit this amazing country regularly.  You join their mailing list to receive the newsletter and learn about future events.  Thank you so much guys!

www.harrogatefinewinecompany.com

   Harrogate Fine Wines, Corn Exchange Cellars, The Ginnel, Harrogate, HG1 2RB

Tel: 01423 522270

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Curried Pheasant & Quinoa Mini Road Kill Pies

A favourite amuse-bouche of mine and a great and easy idea for using road kill rabbit, pigeon or pheasant.  I love making these for my friends!  A wonderful and juicy little ‘mouth-pleaser’ that also pushes a person unfamiliar with eating road kill gently out of their comfort zone. 

 http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/tv-show/come-dine-with-me-recipes/series-10/pheasant-road-kill-pies-recipe

The pheasant was a gift from the A61 – Harrogate to Ripon road. 

Thank you Nature for providing what I needed.

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   Wild Game Terrine

Outside the show, the ‘game’ in my terrines is always road kill.  I wanted to provide an alternative to the road kill pies, just in case someone objected!  I don’t like to see my guests go hungry. lol.  I wanted to use butcher-bought game for my terrine, so in case contestants ate one dish and not the other… an interesting question was awaiting…”So what’s the difference?” 

Thank you Peter Hutchinson at Hutchinson’s Butchers opposite the C15th Ripley Castle for supplying the rabbits and pheasant for the Wild Game Terrine.  This is a real olde-worlde butchers shop with a wonderful atmosphere and incredibly friendly, authentic staff.  I have used their services on various occasions over the years and have especially loved to see the game hanging up outside their front window – a wonderful reminder to folk that what they are eating was once hopping or flapping around recently.  I really admire how they operate – real butchers performing an honest job that reminds one of being part of a food chain – not ‘poshed-up’ like other places, where the meat is so sanitised, wrapped in layers of plastic and separated from nature that one can almost forget that the flesh being eaten was once alive and then killed before ending up on the dinner table!

 HUTCHINSON’S BUTCHERS, Ripley, Harrogate, HG3 3AX

Tel:  01423 770110.

 map

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Foraged Fruit Chutney

The chutney recipe was donated by my beautiful friend Tina Langshaw of Harrogate.  She substituted the sugar for honey especialy for an awkward friend…who, me? lol.

The Gambian spices were gifted from her relative from The Gambia.

http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/tv-show/come-dine-with-me-recipes/series-10/foraged-fruit-chutney-recipe

The plums were picked locally in Amanda & Andrew’s garden in Harrogate. Thank you for letting us raid your crop.

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The Vegetables

Eating organically grown vegetables is something I always try to do.  I wanted to promote a local producer of organic vegetables and meat. 

The wonderfully all organic vegetables I used were donated by Steven, Patrick & Louise Snowden from Hawthorne Organics.  Organic farming prohibits the use of chemical pesticides and fertilisers and promotes a less intensive way of farming. Crop yields are generally lower which which tends to result in higher prices than conventionally farmed crops. Farming in this way is much more labour intensive.  They started farming organically 20 years ago and today the farm is entirely organic. They have 220 acres of mainly arable land, 12 acres is coppiced willows grown on contract for Drax power station to be used as a carbon neutral fuel; 20 acres are wooded on the farm, which is the site of an ancient settlement. The wood is home to many wild animals including badgers, deer and foxes and many species of birds. The farm is in the Countryside Stewardship Scheme and Higher Level Stewardship Scheme providing areas of land dedicated to wildlife by the planting of crops suitable for winter feeding birds. Thank you Hawthorne family for being so generous and such good sports.

Hawthorne Organics, Weeton Lane, Dunkeswick, LS17 9LP

Tel: 0113 2886637 or 07779 140120

Fax: 0113 2886754

Email: info@hawthorneorganics.co.uk

 

Or visit the farm shop: Weds – Sat, 10am – 4pm (open till 6pm on Thurs)

  http://hawthorneorganics.co.uk/

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Water Buffalo Bourguignon

I really wanted to use something a little more exotic than beef.  I chose to promote a local farm that bred other cattle, that didn’t do as much damage to the environment as commercially farmed cows.  I was recently in the Amazon and I was dismayed to see swathes of precious forest cut down for grazing cattle. One could drive past miles and miles of cows en route to anywhere, bred for mass production of hamburgers!  Buffalo produce far less methane and the meat is far sweeter and less fatty. 

The water buffalo was generously donated by the Langthorne family, doing a fantastic job rearing special breeds such as buffalo, highland cattle, wapiti, longhorn, pere david, emu, boer goat, yak, white park, bison, red deer, soay sheep, dexter & ironage pigs.  The whole family Paul, Kate, Jennifer, Diane and Andrew help care for the animals, staff their farmer’s market stall and run the family farm tours.  They brought their first two buffalo, Fleur and Georgina, approximately 10 years ago to supply buffalo milk for Andrew who suffered severe dairy allergies. He also has Cystic Fibrosis and the home sourced meat, milk and cheese are extremely good nutrition for him.  The herd has grown to over 300 in the last 10 years. The deer, wapiti, emu, ironage pig, sheep & goats have arrived over the years and are lovely to see in the fields. They do not ship their animals out to be slaughtered. They have their own abattoir to ensure the most humane of practices which minimises stress to the animals.  Jennifer, Diane & Andrew will answer any questions you have whilst on the ‘farm tour’.

Langthorne’s Buffalo Produce, Crawford Grange, Brompton, Northallerton, DL6 2PD

Tel: 01609 776937

Visit or collect from the farm or at local farmers’ markets. Please telephone in advance

 www.langthornes-buffalo-produce.co.uk 

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Baileys Brûlée

with Drunken Foraged Fruits

  The recipe for the Baileys Brûlée and sound advice is courtesy of Nick Ellam, my friend and top chef of Harrogate.  Thanks for letting me pick your brains and for your helpful hints, tips and especially the ‘6P’s…

 “Planning & Preparation Prevents Piss-Poor Performance!!”

– thanks Nick!!

  The Blackberries picked from local hedgerows. Thank you Nature again for providing what I needed!

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The Honey

The honey was donated by my friend Mary of Wakefield – her husband keeps bees.  A very important job considering the shocking decline in the bee population over recent years.

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 The Bush Tucker Challenge

I am an avid traveller with a keen interest in anthropology and I learn as much as I can about indigenous peoples, how they live and cook, new & raw ingredients, and the impact they have on the environment and our health.  I also seek out the weird and wonderful, be that ‘Cuy’ in Peru, ‘Fugu’ in Japan or deep fried crickets in Cambodia… I love anything unidentifiable on a stick and have even licked termites directly off the trees in the Amazon Jungle!  Lol.  Mmmmm, minty!  I absolutely ADORE all food.

The end of the meal as an unforgettable experience for my diners and something that is very typical of my personality.  Whenever I come back from travelling, I always bring back some culinary delicacy or oddity for my friends to try.  This year it was a selection of Japanese ‘Otsumami’ – beer snacks!  These can be anything from peanuts and baked baby sesame seed crabs to fish spine crisps and shredded dried squid. Of course I brought back the strangest thing I could find. My Bush Tucker Challenge was very generously donated by two EDIBLE.com stockists.

The winner of my BUSH TUCKER CHALLENGE won a small prize relating to the theme of the meal that evening – a Collins Gem FOOD FOR FREE!  I keep a copy of this in my little motorhome at all times.

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 Civet Coffee

  Kopi Luwak, as it is known, is considered to be the world’s finest coffee by Native Sumatrans. This coffee has an intense, but delicate flavour and no aftertaste, which is unique in coffee. This flavour is due to the fact that the coffee has been partially fermented by passing through the digestive system of the Civet (a small, lithe-bodied, mostly arboreal mammal native to the tropics of Africa and Asia).

 Extremely exotic petits fours

The coffee, chocolate-coated scorpions, leaf cutter ants, BBQ worms and thai curried crickets by edible.com were generously donated by Kevin Hadlow, Head of Retail at ‘The Food Company Anglia Ltd’, Essex.   Thank you Kevin. You have been a real star!

The Food Company Anglia Ltd, 86 London Road, Mark’s Tey, Colchester, Essex, C06 1ED

 Tel: 01206 214000, Fax:01206 214019

http://www.thefoodcompany.co.uk/

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Gift Bags

I wanted to give each contestant a gift to open in the taxi on the way home.  I thought a genuinely edible scorpion encased in a mouth watering hard candy lollypop would do.  Mmmmmm

These edible.com gift bags were very generously donated by the incredibly friendly & professional Neil Setterfield, Store Director, FENWICKS in York.  Thank you Neil for the Vodkalix Scorpion lollies.

Fenwick Ltd, Coppergate Centre, York. YO1 9WY

Tel: 01904 643322

Email: neilsetterfield@fenwick.co.uk

 http://www.fenwick.co.uk/

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The Fancy Dress Costume – Dead Fred Elliot 

Thank you Asda Harrogate for the loan of the hat and smock.

Thank you Country Butchers on Leeds Road for the loan of the apron.

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